College of Music

Main Office

Music Building, 247

P.O. Box 311367

Denton, TX 76203-1367

(940) 565-2791

Office of Graduate Studies

Music Building, 249

(940) 565-3721

Web site: www.music.unt.edu

William V. May, Interim Dean

Thomas S. Clark, Associate Dean

Jon C. Nelson, Associate Dean

Edward A. Baird, Director of Graduate Studies

Graduate Faculty: Adkins, Alorwoyie, Baird, Banowetz, Borodin, Bowman, Bradetich, Brothers, Brusilow, Bush, Candelaria, Cho, Clardy, Clark, Collins, Cooper, Corporon, Di Fiore, Dubberly, Dubois, Dworak, Eschbach, Eustis, Fink, Fisher, Ford, Friedson, Froehlich, Garner, Gibbons, Gillespie, Groom-Thornton, Haerle, Hamilton, Harlos, Heiberg, Henry, Homer, Hudnall, Huglo, Ivey, Jackson, K. Johnson, T. Johnson, Joyner, Kagarice, Kern, Killam, Klein, Lewis, Little, May, McCroskey, McTee, Meltzer, Miller, Nelson, Nestler, Osadchy, Papich, Paul, Peters, Phipps, Ramsey, Reynolds, Riggs, Ritscher, Roberts, Rohwer, Rutherford, Scharnberg, Schietroma, Scott, Shrader, Slater, Sn ider, Soph, Sovik, Steinel, Sundberg, Sundquist, Veazey, Viardo, Warner, Winsor, Wodnicki.

The College of Music offers to aspiring performers, composers, scholars and music educators a diversity of graduate programs in all aspects of the musical arts leading to the following degrees:

It is the purpose of these programs to develop and nurture the artistry, creativity, scholarship and professional competence that will provide musical leadership and standards of excellence in the various areas of musical activity in our society: cultural, pedagogical and commercial. The variety of possible majors within these degree programs and the comprehensive program of instruction in all areas of the College of Music provide a richly textured musical environment in which the musical experience of the student will be broadened as the area of specialization is pursued.

All degree programs are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music [11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21, Reston, VA 20190; (703) 437-0700, fax: (703) 437-6312].

Graduate work in the College of Music is under the guidance of the director of graduate studies and appropriate committees.

Facilities

The Music Library, one of the largest in the United States, holds more than 120,000 items of music books, periodicals, scores, parts and microforms. It also owns complete works of more than 200 composers, among them new editions of the works of Bach, Handel, Berlioz, Mozart and Schoenberg, together with well over 100 historical collections.

Other noteworthy materials in the Music Library include the manuscript collection of the letters and early compositions of Arnold Schoenberg; the library of Lloyd Hibberd, distinguished North Texas musicologist, containing about 10,000 volumes especially strong in French baroque first editions and manuscripts; sets of Hofmeister's Handbuch der Musikalischen Literatur, Pazdirek's Universal-Handbuch der Musikliteratur and the Dictionary Catalog of the New York Public Library Music Division; a collection of more than 1,000 Duke Ellington discs, tapes and transcriptions, ranging from his earliest recordings in the 1920s through the 1960s; the Stan Kenton Collection of more than 1,600 original (manuscript) scores and parts used by the Stan Kenton bands and left by Kenton to the university libraries in 1962 and 1979; and an archive of scores and recordings of works composed by distinguished North Texas alumni Don Gillis and Julia Smith.

Adjacent to the Music Library is the Audio-Center, containing more than 150,000 musical recordings. The Audio-Center provides modern facilities for both group and individual listening.

Research

Research in the College of Music is conducted in the areas of musicology, music theory, music education, composition and performance practice. Independent investigation and creative problem solving also play large roles in the processes of composition and performance study, where the products of research are musical compositions and performance interpretations.

Theoria, a scholarly journal, emanates from the Division of Music History, Theory, and Ethnomusicology. The Southwest Journal of Music is edited and published by the Graduate Association of Musicologists and Theorists. Research funding is received from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and faculty research grants.

Research projects in music education range from empirical description and experimentation to historical and philosophical inquiries. Faculty research activities include investigating musical perception and attitudes, preferences, abilities, aptitude, skill development, teacher behavior in classroom and rehearsal, and aspects of professional socialization. Music education faculty hold national and international offices in prestigious professional organizations and serve as editorial readers for such refereed journals as the Journal of Research in Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education and Update: The Applications of Research in Music Education. Ongoing research is supported by faculty research grants and sponsorship of professional organizations.

In composition, creative projects are supported by faculty research funds and other sources, including commissions and awards from a variety of private and public agencies and foundations. The activities of the faculty and students encompass virtually every aspect of contemporary music. Grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and UNT faculty research funds provide optimal real-time computer systems in the Center for Experimental Music and Intermedia. Orchestral, wind, choral and chamber music by faculty and students is performed by UNT ensembles, as well as music involving the integration of computer music into intermedia composition.

Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) plays a major role in the research and teaching activities in music theory. Graduate students operate the CAI Lab, which provides programmed instruction and drills in music fundamentals for undergraduate theory students, and together with theory faculty develop further software applications for the program.

The International Trombone Association Journal and The Clarinet (quarterly journal of the International Clarinet Society) are edited by faculty members in the College of Music.

Admission Requirements

Note: Admission requirements were being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies or the program for current admission requirements, or see information posted on the graduate school web site (www.tsgs.unt.edu).

Applicants for any graduate degree program must meet the requirements for the preceding degree in the same major field as listed in the Undergraduate Catalog. Applicants may be required to take specified courses to remove deficiencies as determined by the transcript evaluation. Students may enroll in courses to remove deficiencies concurrently with those graduate degree courses for which they are eligible. Deficiencies may be removed only by (1) enrolling in and passing an equivalent course at UNT or another accredited university, (2) submitting evidence of achievement, or (3) passing a proficiency examination, approved by the program area. To prepare for such examinations, students may audit courses, subject to university regulations (see Undergraduate Catalog). The auditing of a course alone may not be the basis for removing a deficiency. In addition, the College of Music may request the applicant to validate any course work or skill by examination or performance.

Graduate Placement Examination

All new graduate students in music must take an entrance examination covering theory, history of music and music literature. The examination will be given each semester. See the Academic Calendar at the front of this catalog. (Description, schedule and information concerning the use of test results are available in the Office of Graduate Studies in Music.)

New graduate students in piano also must take an entrance examination in piano literature. The results are used for advisory and remedial purposes.

Transfer Credit

Use of transfer credit toward graduate degrees is subject to policies stated in the Master's Degree Requirements and Doctoral Degree Requirements sections of this catalog and must be approved by the appropriate graduate music committee and the dean of the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies.

Exceptions to Policies

Exceptions to stated policies may be made only when approved by the appropriate graduate committee, the dean of the College of Music and, where appropriate, the dean of the School of Graduate Studies.

Degree Plan

By the completion of 12 hours of study, the graduate student must select an advisory committee (at least three members) and file a degree plan. The degree plan, listing all courses to be required for the degree, must be approved by the student's major professor (and advisory committee members in the case of the doctorate) and submitted to the director of graduate studies in music. Forms for this purpose are available in the College of Music graduate studies office, Music Building, Room 249.

All changes in the degree plan must be submitted in writing, approved by the major professor and the degree committee chair, and filed with the graduate studies office. Degree requirements are determined by
the Graduate Catalog in force at the time the degree plan is approved by the graduate dean. Degree plans may not be filed in the semester a student plans to graduate.

Master of Music Degree Program

Students seeking the master's degree should consult the director of graduate studies in music in preparing a tentative program to meet the degree requirements and in selecting a major professor and an advisory committee. By the completion of 12 semester hours, the student should file a degree plan and request an advisory committee.

Degree Requirements

Requirements for each degree program are outlined below. The Office of Graduate Studies in Music provides complete information concerning procedures and administrative details.

Before the degree is granted, the candidate must pass a final comprehensive examination either oral, written or both covering the field of concentration and, if applicable, the thesis or research problem. The examination may be taken

no more than three times.

Participation in Performance Laboratories

Participation in two semesters of laboratory or ensemble is recommended for all master's degree students. Students who major in band or orchestral instruments are required to participate, with or without credit, in two semesters of laboratory; one semester is required for voice majors. Those who major in music education are required to participate in two semesters of either laboratory or ensemble, with or without credit. Participation is not required for doctoral students except when advised by the major professor. Laboratories are a cappella choir, chamber choir, concert choir, men's chorus, women's chorus, grand chorus, symphony orchestra, wind ensemble, symphonic band, concert band, marching band, jazz labs and accompanying. To meet this requirement, students must choose laboratories approved by the major advisers. Credit may be earned by enrolling in MULB 5171-5175 (1 semester hour each).

Ensembles available for graduate student participation are: opera theater, collegium musicum, chamber orchestra, wind ensemble, brass choir, trumpet choir, horn choir, trombone choir, tuba-euphonium ensemble, flute choir, percussion ensemble, steel drum band, marimba ensemble, African ensemble, gamelan ensemble, electric and acoustic guitar ensembles, new music ensemble, and smaller string, woodwind, brass, harp and jazz chamber ensembles.

Music History and Theory Lecture Series Attendance

Each graduate student with a declared major in musicology or music theory is expected to attend all lectures presented in the Division of Music History and Theory Lecture Series during each long semester of full-time enrollment (9 hours).

Major in Theory

The student must submit GRE subject (advanced) test scores in music to the Office of Graduate Studies in Music before the degree plan is filed.

The Master of Music with a major in theory offers two options: (1) the traditional 32-hour degree with thesis, and (2) a 36-hour degree without thesis but with specialization in computer education and its application to theory pedagogy.

The following courses are required for a 32-hour program of study.

In place of MUGC 5950, Thesis (6 hours), and piano requirements, the program will accept the following courses for a 36-hour program.

Additional Requirements

Before applying for graduation in this degree, the student must pass an examination testing reading knowledge of one foreign language. The choice of language is to be approved by the candidate's degree committee.

Evidence of Satisfactory Progress

Students must maintain a minimum overall B average and must have no grade lower than B in courses in the major field. Students not meeting this standard will be placed on probation for one semester. Students not fulfilling the conditions of probation will be dismissed from the program by majority vote of the faculty.

Major in Composition

Before being admitted to graduate standing in composition, the applicant must submit several works in various media showing originality and technical competence.

At the completion of the first semester of MUCP 5190, students will be reviewed by the composition faculty and appropriate recommendations for continuance will be made.

Candidates will be expected to arrange for performances of their work and keep a record of works completed and performed. This record will be reviewed by the composition faculty and, when necessary, recommendations will be made for additional performances or works to be completed.

The following courses are required for completion of the 32-hour program in composition:

Major Field, 15 Hours

Related Field, 9 Hours (choose one)

1. Conducting. Required: 9 hours selected from MUAG 5000, 5800 and 5850, and MUED 5300

2. Jazz Studies. Required: MUJS 5470 and 5480; 3 hours selected from MUJS 4700, 4710, 5450, 5760 and 5780.

3. Musicology. Required: 3 hours selected from MUMH 4750, 4760, 4770 and 4780; 6 hours selected from MUMH 5050, 5070, 5150, 5200, 5330, 5340, 5420 and 5550.

4. Performance. Required: Audition; MUAC 5500-level, 6 hours; and 3 hours selected from MUAG 5640, 5650, 5800 and 5850, MUEN 5040, 5530-5540, 5602, 5605, 5611, 5616, 5617, 5621, 5624 and 5625, MUCM 5500-level, and MULB 5170-level.

5. Theory. Required: 9 hours selected from MUTH 5080, 5090, 5355, 5360, 5370 and 5470.

Electives, 4 Hours

Four hours of music electives also are required for a major in composition.

Evidence of Satisfactory Progress

Students must maintain a minimum overall B average and must have no grade lower than B in courses in the major field. Students not meeting this standard will be placed on probation for one semester. Students not fulfilling the conditions of probation will be dismissed from the program by majority vote of the composition faculty. Additional jury reviews may be called for at any time during the course of study in order to monitor the student's progress.

Major in Musicology

The following courses are required for the 32-hour program of study.

Additional Requirements

Before applying for graduation in this degree, the student must pass an examination testing reading knowledge of either German or French.

Evidence of Satisfactory Progress

Students must maintain a minimum overall B average and must have no grade lower than B in courses in the major field. Students not meeting this standard will be placed on probation for one semester. Students not fulfilling the conditions of probation will be dismissed from the program by majority vote of the faculty.

Major in Jazz Studies

To be admitted to the program, each applicant must (1) play an audition that demonstrates technical and improvisational skill to the level of MUJS 3360 and (2) submit manuscripts that demonstrate arranging skill equivalent to the level of MUJS 4610.

At the end of each long semester, the student's work will be reviewed for continuance in the program. This review will consist either of an improvisation skill jury, or an evaluation of written projects.

The following courses are required for the 32-hour program of study:

Major Field, 20 Hours

Related Field, 9 Hours (choose one)

1. Composition. Required: MUCP 5180 (6 hours); 3 hours selected from MUCP 4430, 4510, 4810, 5680, 5690, 5700 and 5710.

2. Conducting. Required: 9 hours selected from MUAG 5000, 5800 and 5850, and MUED 5300.

3. Music Education. Required: 9 hours selected from MUED 5100, 5300, 5500, 5510, 5520, 5890, 6430 and 6470.

4. Musicology. Required: one course from MUMH 4750, 4760, 4770 and 4780; two courses from MUMH 5050, 5070, 5150, 5200, 5210, 5330, 5340, 5420 and 5550.

5. Opera. Required: MUMH 5070 and 6 hours selected from MUAG 5640, 5650 and 5660.

6. Performance. Required: audition; MUAC 5500-level (6 hours); 3 hours from MUAG 4360 or 4370, MUMH 5550, graduate chamber music (MUCM 5500-level or MUEN 5600-level) or music laboratory (MULB 5170-level) other than MULB 5174.

7. Theory. Required: 9 hours selected from MUTH 5080, 5090, 5355, 5360, 5370 and 5470.

8. Vocal Pedagogy. Required: SPHS 4130; one course from SPHS 4120, 5790 and 5810; one course from MUAG 5600 and 5610.

9. Accompanying. Required: audition; MUAG 4210, 5260 and 5270.

Electives, 3 Hours

May be in or outside music, but not in the student's related field. If performance is the related field, electives taken in performance will not count for this requirement.

Additional Requirements

In addition to the final comprehensive examination, the student must present a public performance as a final project. The program may demonstrate either improvisational or arranging skills, dependent upon the student's emphasis in the program. All final projects must be approved in advance by the MM in jazz studies committee. If necessary, upon recommendation of the faculty, additional performance may be required.

Major in Performance

Performance majors may specialize in piano, organ, voice, conducting or any of the following orchestral instruments: violin, viola, cello, double bass, flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, bassoon, French horn, trumpet, trombone, euphonium, tuba, percussion, harp, guitar, harpsichord or woodwinds.

The programs are described below. At the point of graduation, students pursuing the performance major will be listed as having a specialization in the appropriate area.

All master's degree performance majors must include on their degree plan a related field of not fewer than 9 hours selected from the options list below.

1. Accompanying. Required: audition; MUAG 4210, 5260 and 5270.

2. Composition. Required: MUCP 5180 (6 hours); 3 hours selected from MUCP 4430, 4510, 4810, 5680, 5690, 5700 and 5710.

3. Conducting. (Not open as a related field to those with a specialization in conducting.) Required: audition, 9 hours selected from MUAG 5000, 5800 and 5850, and MUED 5300.

4. Jazz Studies. Required: MUJS 5470 and 5480; 3 hours selected from MUJS 4700, 4710, 5450, 5760, and 5780.

5. Music Education. For those with a specialization in conducting. Required: 9 hours selected from MUED 5100, 5300, 5500, 5510, 5520, 5890, 6430 and 6470.

For all other specializations in performance. Required: 9 hours selected from MUED 5100, 5120, 5300, 5500, 5510, 5520, 5870, 5890, and 6430.

6. Musicology. Required: one course from MUMH 4750, 4760, 4770 and 4780; two courses from MUMH 5050, 5070, 5150, 5200, 5210, 5330, 5340, 5420 and 5550.

7. Opera. Required: MUMH 5070 and 6 hours selected from MUAG 5640, 5650, and 5660.

8. Theory. Required: 9 hours selected from MUTH 5080, 5090, 5355, 5360, 5370, and 5470.

9. Vocal Pedagogy. Required: SPHS 4130; one course from SPHS 4120, 5790 and 5810; one course from MUAG 5600 and 5610.

10. Applied Music. (Available only to those with a conducting specialization.) Required: audition; MUAC 5500-level (6 hours); 3 hours from MUAG 5640, 5650 and 5850, MUEN 5040, 5530-5540, 5602, 5605, 5611, 5616, 5617, 5621, 5624, and 5625, MUCM 5500-level, and MULB 5170-level.

Specialization in Piano

To be admitted to the 32-hour program, each applicant must show proof of having played a solo senior recital or its equivalent. Also, each applicant must play for the piano faculty an audition consisting of three major works: (1) a contrapuntal work, preferably 18th century; (2) a sonata or concerto; and (3) any other standard work. All three are to be performed from memory.

After qualification, each semester's repertoire shall include a virtuoso etude. Each candidate also must present a standard concerto and at least one non-traditional 20th-century work during the course of study.

The following courses are required.

Related Field, 9 Hours

Select an area from those listed above.

Electives, 6 Hours

Six hours of electives are required for the major in piano.

Additional Requirements

In addition, the following repertoire must be memorized. The repertoire must consist of material that the candidate has studied since becoming a graduate student.

1. Two complete programs, one of which must be presented publicly. The program for the public recital must be approved in advance by the piano faculty.

2. One complete concerto drawn from the standard repertoire.

Specialization in Organ

Before becoming a candidate for this degree, the applicant who is not a graduate of UNT in organ must perform before a faculty jury a 30-minute program representative of undergraduate repertoire.

The following courses are required for the 32-hour program.

Related Field, 9 Hours

Select an area from those listed above. For those electing conducting as a related field, MUAG 5810 is required and may count toward the 9-hour related field course options.

Electives, 6 Hours

Three to six hours of electives also are required to complete the 32-hour specialization in organ.

Additional Requirements

All students must demonstrate proficiency at a level equivalent to the Associate Examination of the American Guild of Organists.

In addition, two complete recital programs must be prepared, one of which must be presented publicly. The repertoire for both programs must consist of material that the candidate has studied since becoming a graduate student. The program for the public recital must be approved in advance by the organ faculty.

Performance majors are required to play one major work from memory on the degree recital.

Specialization in Voice

Students wishing to specialize in voice must meet the following requirements to qualify for admission to candidacy.

1. A repertoire as extensive as that required for the Bachelor of Music degree with a major in voice at UNT.

2. Performance from memory before a faculty jury a program of at least 20 minutes, which includes selections in Italian, French, German and English, as well as an aria from an opera and one from an oratorio. Detailed instructions for the audition should be obtained from the chair of the division of vocal studies prior to or at registration. Students will be required to take without graduate credit the undergraduate diction courses in those languages in which they do not demonstrate proficiency.

The following courses are required for the 32-hour program.

Related Field, 9 Hours

Select an area from those listed above.

Electives, 7 Hours

Seven hours of electives also are required for the major in voice.

Additional Requirements

Students are required to take jury examinations in each semester of enrollment in voice until the recital is successfully completed.

During the final semester of graduate study, the student will be required to present one complete recital from memory. Any recital being presented as a partial fulfillment of the requirements for a master's degree in voice must be approved both in program content and in performance quality by the voice faculty. The performance of the recital must be approved at a hearing by the voice faculty at least three weeks prior to the date of public presentation.

Specialization in an Orchestral Instrument

Before being admitted to graduate study with a specialization in an orchestral instrument, candidates will perform before a faculty jury an audition of repertoire appropriate to the area and degree.

The following courses are required for the 32-hour program.

Related Field, 9 Hours

Select an area from those listed above.

Electives, 9 Hours

Nine hours of electives also are required for the specialization in an orchestral instrument.

Additional Requirements

In addition, all majors will perform a complete recital in public, consisting of music, which the candidate has studied since becoming a graduate student at the University of North Texas. The repertoire for this recital will be determined by the student's major teacher, subject to approval of the area faculty. The recital performance will be passed upon by a majority of those faculty members in attendance from the student's area of performance.

Specialization in Woodwinds

To be admitted to the program the applicant must pass auditions on the principal and two other woodwind instruments.

The following courses are required for the 32-hour program.

Related Field, 9 Hours

Select an area from those listed above.

Electives, 4 Hours

Four hours of electives also are required for the specialization in woodwinds.

Additional Requirements

Graduation requirements include relevant minimum standards for the principal instrument and the four other woodwinds. The candidate will perform a recital on the principal instrument and two of the other woodwind instruments to complete the program. Appropriate minimum standards and requirements on the remaining two woodwind instruments will be met in jury examination. Repertoire and memorization requirements will be determined by the student's teacher, subject to approval of the woodwind faculty. Recital performance will be passed upon by a majority of the woodwind faculty members in attendance.

Specialization in Conducting

Applicants for the Master of Music degree in performance with a specialization in conducting must hold the Bachelor of Music degree or its equivalent. This program is open to a limited number of students based on the availability of conducting opportunities. Applicants are requested to submit a complete dossier, including transcripts, curriculum vitae, letters of recommendation, programs, tapes of conducting performances (and solo performances, if desired), and a statement of career objectives. A videotape of the candidate conducting, although not required, is desirable. All materials should be submitted by February 15 to the director of graduate studies of the College of Music.

To be admitted to a graduate program in conducting, applicants will be auditioned before the conducting faculty with a university ensemble appropriate to the major area of emphasis (band, choir, opera or orchestra).

The following courses are required for the 36-hour program.

Related Field, 9 Hours

Select an area from those listed above.

Additional Requirements

Students with a related field in applied music are required to take jury examinations each semester and pass a final proficiency hearing after completion of the required hours in applied music.

Candidates will conduct a public performance in their primary area. This recital will be evaluated by at least three members of the conducting faculty.

Major in Music Education

Undergraduate prerequisites include a minimum of 14 hours of theory, 12 hours of music history and/or literature, two semesters of conducting and 12 hours of methods courses in music.

The following courses are required for the 32-hour program:

Music Education, 12 Hours

1. MUED 5280, Admission Seminar, 3 hours. Required of all students and to be taken the first time the seminar is scheduled after the student begins work toward this degree.

2. MUED 5120, Applied Research in Music Education, 3 hours.

3. Professional specialization courses selected by the student, 6 hours.

Minor or Related Field, 6 Hours

Six hours in a minor or related field are required for the major in music education (MUMH 5330 and 5340 do not apply).

Electives, 3 Hours

Three hours of electives also are required for the music education major.

Applied Music, 5 Hours

1. Principal performance, 3 hours.

2. Secondary performance, 2 hours.

Thesis, 6 Hours

The student must complete 6 hours in MUGC 5950, Thesis.

Additional Requirements

Demonstration of adequate proficiency in the major performance medium must precede the final comprehensive examinations.

The final comprehensive examination given at the end of the degree work will include but not be limited to questions on the thesis.

Master of Music Education

The Master of Music Education degree is designed to focus on teaching skills, school administrative and leadership skills, and current trends in the field of music education.

Three basic differences exist between the Master of Music Education, defined here, and the Master of Music (music education). These differences are (1) the Master of Music Education requires 36 hours of course work while the Master of Music degree requires 32; (2) the Master of Music Education degree does not necessarily include a thesis; and (3) the Master of Music does not necessarily include 6 hours of course work outside the field of music. Recitals are not required for either degree, but students are encouraged to perform in solo recital.

Undergraduate prerequisites include a minimum of 14 hours of theory, 12 hours of music history or literature, two semesters of conducting and 12 hours of methods courses in music.

Degree Requirements

The following courses are required for the 36-hour program:

Music Education, 12 Hours

1. MUED 5280, Admission Seminar, 3 hours. Required of all students and to be taken the first time the seminar is scheduled after the student begins work toward this degree.

2. MUED 5120, Applied Research in Music Education, 3 hours.

3. Professional specialization courses selected by the student, 6 hours.

Non-Music Education Courses in Music, 6 Hours

Selected by the student from music history, music theory, composition, jazz studies or other.

Electives, 12 Hours

May include up to 8 hours in applied music and up to two laboratories or ensembles. May include non-music courses.

Courses Outside Music, 6 Hours

The Master of Music Education degree requires 6 hours of courses outside the College of Music.

Additional Requirements

Demonstration of adequate proficiency in the major performance medium must precede the final comprehensive examinations.

Comprehensive examinations covering general knowledge in the field of music (General Field) and knowledge in an area of specialization within music education (Special Field) are given in two written tests (two days) and, after the successful completion of the written portions, in an oral examination.

Master of Arts

Major in Music

MUMH 5410, Introduction to Research in Music (3 hours), is required for the 33-hour program.

Field of Concentration, 9 Hours (choose one)

1. Applied Music. Required: audition; 4 hours (two semesters minimum) in principal applied area; 2 hours in secondary applied area; 3 hours in related academic literature or pedagogy courses and graduate ensembles.

2. Composition. Required: MUCP 5180 (6 hours); 3 hours selected from MUCP 5680, 5690, 5700 and 5710, and MUTH 5360, 5370 and 5400.

3. Musicology. Required: MUMH 5420; 6 hours selected from MUMH 4750, 4760, 4770, 4780, 5050, 5070, 5150, 5200, 5330, 5340 and 5550.

4. Theory. Required: 9 hours selected from MUTH 5080, 5090, 5355, 5360, 5370 and 5400.

Minor Field, 6 Hours

Six hours in one field outside of music are required.

Electives, 9 Hours

Not to exceed 3 hours in applied music for the field of concentration in musicology, theory or composition; no applied music electives if the field of concentration is in applied music.

Thesis, 6 Hours

The student must complete 6 hours in MUGC 5950, Thesis, and produce a written academic thesis.

Additional Requirements

Before applying for graduation the student must pass an examination testing reading knowledge of either German or French.

Doctor of Musical Arts

The Doctor of Musical Arts degree is offered in performance (including conducting) and composition, with related fields in accompanying, composition, conducting, jazz studies, music education, musicology, music theory, performance or vocal pedagogy. The degree requires a minimum of three years of work represented by at least 90 hours beyond the bachelor's degree. In addition to the first 30 hours, or the equivalent of the master's degree in the major field, the program for the degree includes a minimum of 60 hours.

The minimum residence requirement for performance and composition students consists of two consecutive long semesters (fall and the following spring, or spring and the following fall) with a minimum load of 9 hours each semester. The minimum residency requirement for conducting students is four consecutive long semesters with a minimum load of 9 hours each semester. Conducting students in wind studies may satisfy the residency requirements by enrolling in two summer sessions, two long semesters, and two more summer sessions, taken consecutively.

Note: Admission requirements were being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies or the program for current admission requirements, or see information posted on the graduate school web site (www.tsgs.unt.edu).

Acceptance into the Doctor of Musical Arts program involves the following steps:

a. Apply for admission to the University through the Robert B. Toulouse School of Graduate Studies (an evaluation of student's transcripts will determine deficiencies in course work).

b. Submit an acceptable score on the general aptitude test (verbal and quantitative) of the Graduate Record
Examination (GRE).

c. Be accepted by the College of Music to do doctoral level work.

d. Attend all orientation sessions scheduled by the director of graduate studies in music.

e. Take the Graduate Placement Examinations for doctoral students given by the college of Music (courses assigned as the result of the GPE must be completed within one calendar year).

f. Be accepted to a specific degree program by audition (for performance and conducting majors) or portfolio evaluation (for composition majors).

When all of these steps are successfully completed, the student will be considered fully admitted to the degree program.

Application Procedures ­ Performance (including Conducting)

Note: Admission requirements were being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies or the program for current admission requirements, or see information posted on the graduate school web site (www.tsgs.unt.edu).

1. The applicant for admission to the Doctor of Musical Arts program in performance or composition will submit the following to the director of graduate studies in music:

a. complete academic transcripts;

b. the names and addresses of three persons qualified to evaluate the applicant's accomplishments and merits and to recommend advanced study;

c. tape recordings of performances;

d. a list of repertoire performed; and

e. programs.

This dossier should be received in the Office of Graduate Studies of the College of Music at least six weeks before the intended date of enrollment.

2. An admission audition for all applicants for the major in performance must be scheduled and performed by the third class day of the first semester of enrollment (second class day of a summer semester). It should be understood that no applied music courses count toward degree requirements until the applicant has passed the admission audition. Audition repertoire in the various fields of performance and scheduling procedures are available from the Office of Graduate Studies in Music.

3. The DMA program in conducting prepares highly qualified conductors in one of three areas: choral studies, orchestral studies or wind studies. It is expected that the applicant will have had significant and extensive experience as a conductor and teacher. The prerequisites for admission to the conducting degree program include: both master's and bachelor's degrees in music from an accredited institution (exceptions may be made for students with degrees in other fields if equivalent musical training can be demonstrated); a mastery of advanced conducting techniques gained through experience beyond the training level; a well-developed level of musicianship and listenership; familiarity with a substantial repertoire of music; at least five years teaching experience or the demonstrated equivalent.

The admission process for conducting applicants will consist of two stages. The materials outlined below are to be submitted by February 1 to the director of graduate studies of the College of Music.

Application Procedures ­ Composition

Note: Admission requirements were being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies or the program for current admission requirements, or see information posted on the graduate school web site (www.tsgs.unt.edu).

1. The applicant for admission to the Doctor of Musical Arts program in composition will submit the following to the director of graduate studies in music:

a. scores and recordings (CD or cassette) of three representative works;

b. professional resume;

c. complete list of original works and performances;

d. complete academic transcripts (photocopies acceptable);

e. official GRE scores (photocopies acceptable);

f. letters of recommendation from three persons qualified to evaluate the applicant's accomplishments and merits and to recommend advanced study;

g. writing sample (e.g., research paper, thesis, etc.); and

h. statement of purpose.

These materials must be received in the Office of Graduate Studies of the college of Music by the spring deadline for consideration for the following academic year.

2. Selected applicants will be interviewed by telephone or asked to audition in person prior to acceptance.

Degree Requirements

In addition to course requirements (listed below), each applicant for the Doctor of Musical Arts degree must meet the following requirements.

Language Requirement

One language, other than the native language or English, chosen to fulfill this requirement will be selected in consultation with the major professor and the student's advisory committee. Specific requirements regarding the Foreign Language Proficiency Examination may be found under "Foreign Language or Tool-Subject Requirement" in the Doctoral Degree Requirements section of this catalog. It is recommended that the language requirement be met within the first three semesters of graduate work to facilitate research. Hours earned do not count toward the degree.

Introduction to Research

It is assumed that an entering DMA student will have had an introduction to research course at the master's level (please see the graduate catalog for course description). If not, the student will be required to take Introduction to Research (MUMH 5410), no later than the second semester of graduate work to facilitate research. Hours earned do not count toward the degree.

The Advisory Committee

The student's advisory committee will include a member who has written a dissertation or similar doctoral document (other than the DMA chairperson), and is made up of:

1. Major professor;

2. Minor professor (related field representative);

3. Committee member; and

4. DMA chairperson (ex officio)

The advisory committee should be selected and approved by the time the student has completed 12 hours of course work.

Placement Examinations

Following the DMA placement examinations in musicology and music theory (administered during orientation week), the student will be counseled by the major professor or major area designate. In conjunction with the faculties administering the examinations, the major adviser will develop a plan, if needed, to satisfy deficiencies (not to exceed 6 credits of musicology and 6 credits of music theory). Classes taken as a result of the placement examinations may be counted toward the degree in either the related field or as electives, but not in the musicology/music theory component.

Related Fiel d Course Requirements

All DMA degree candidates must include on their degree plan a related field of not fewer than 12 hours selected form the options listed below.

1. Accompanying. Required: audition and MUAG 5260 and 5270 (6 hours); 6 hours selected from MUAG 6280, 6290, and 6370. Recommended elective: MUAG 5210 (may be repeated for credit).

2. Composition. Required: MUCP 5180 (6 hours); select 6 hours from MUCP 5680, 5690, 5700, 5710, 5590, 6150, and 6410, and MUTH 6690.

3. Conducting. Pursuing a related field in conducting requires that the candidate apply to and be accepted by one of three areas: choral conducting, orchestral conducting or wind conducting. The candidate's curriculum in the related field will be determined by the director of the discipline chosen. Choral conducting: 12 hours selected from MUAG 5000, 5800, 5810, 6533 (maximum of 3 hours) and 6850; Orchestral conducting: MUAG 6900 (Special Problems: Orchestral Conducting, 3 hours), MUAG 6850 (9 hours); Wind conducting: MUGC 5890 (3 hours); MUAG 5850, 5860 and 6850 (9 hours).

4. Jazz Studies. Required: audition and MUJS 5470 and 5480 (6 hours); 3 hours selected from MUJS 5450, 5490, 5760, 5780 and 5900-5910; 3 hours of participation in jazz ensembles and applied study.

5. Music Education. Required: MUED 5120 and 5280 (6 hours); 6 hours selected from any MUED 5000- or 6000-level course. Note: If the student has taken either MUED 5120 or 5280 at UNT or the equivalent at another university (to be determined by the coordinator of the music education master's or doctoral program), the student may choose two other MUED 5000- or 6000-level courses.

6. Music Theory. Required: 12 hours selected from MUTH 5080, 5090, 5355, 5360, 5370, 5400 and 6680. Classes taken as a result of the placement examinations may be counted toward the degree in either the related field or as electives, but not in the musicology/music theory component. The classes used to fulfill the music theory component may not be duplicated in the related field (if music theory is the related field of choice).

7. Musicology. Required: MUMH 5420 (3 hours); 9 hours selected from any of the following (6 hours must be at the 6000 level) MUMH 5050, 5070, 5150, 5200, 5330, 5340, 5550, 6000, 6010, 6020, 6030, 6080, 6160, 6530, 6540, 6740, 6750, 6760 and 6770. Classes taken as a result of the placement examinations may be counted toward the degree in either the related field or as electives, but not in the musicology/music theory component. The classes used to fulfill the musicology component may not be duplicated in the related field (if musicology is the related field of choice).

8. Performance. Required: audition and 12 hours selected of appropriate courses from MUAC (6500 level), and other courses in literature and pedagogy. (Open only to those with a major in conducting or composition.)

9. Vocal Pedagogy. Required: 12 hours selected from SPHS 5775, 5810, 5870 and 5900, and MUAG 5600, 5610 and 6900. Courses from both departments must be included.

Qualifying Examinations in Major Field, Related Field, and Other Required Areas of Study

Each student is required to pass twelve (12) hours of written examination in his or her major field, related field, and other required areas of study, in proportion to the design of the degree. Following successful completion of these examinations, the student is required to pass a two-hour oral examination administered by the student's advisory committee. These examinations are taken at the conclusion of all course work (excluding dissertation), and are coordinated by the major advisor. The examinations are graded by the people submitting the questions, as well as others who may be designated by the major advisor.

The qualifying examinations measure a broad knowledge of musical study. They are designed to establish the student's ability to engage both in scholarly research and in professional work in the major area supported by a complete musical comprehension and a broad perspective.

The student may take the qualifying examinations when the following conditions have been met: (a) all deficiencies have been removed, and (b) 30 hours of course work beyond the master's degree have been completed.

When all three parts of the examination have been completed successfully, the student is recommended for admission to candidacy for the degree. The examination may be taken no more than three times.

Before enrolling for MUGC 6951, the dissertation credits, the candidate must first (a) be accepted into the program by audition and (b) file a degree plan. The language requirement must be met before enrolling in the lecture recital (or one of the other options).

After passing the qualifying examinations and having been admitted to candidacy, the student must maintain continuous dissertation enrollment (MUGC 6951-6954) each long semester and at least one summer semester each year until the dissertation has been completed and accepted by the graduate dean.

Final Comprehensive Oral Examination and Dissertation Defense

Upon completion of the dissertation credits and the qualifying examinations, the student is required to pass a two-hour final comprehensive oral examination and dissertation defense of his/her project before the advisory committee.

Grades

A grade of B or better is required in courses used to satisfy DMA degree requirements.

Curricula for the Degree

Major Field in Performance

Last 60 Hours of Study

1. Major performance, 16 hours.*

2. Literature in the major field, 6 hours.

3. Dissertation: 12 hours, the written documentation should be at a level acceptable for juried publication. Choose one of the following:

Option I: 3 recitals (3 credits each); 1 lecture-recital (50-60 minutes/3 credits); and performance and critical essay (25 page minimum);

Option II: 3 recitals (3 credits each); 1 lecture (50-60 minutes/3 credits); and thesis (30 page minimum); or

Option III: 3 recitals (3 credits each); 1 written project (3 credits); and doctoral document (100 page minimum).

Related Field, 12 Hours

Choose from one of the following areas of study: accompanying, composition, conducting, jazz studies, music education, music theory or musicology. Specific graduate courses to be determined in consultation with the chair of the related area. See "Related Field Course Requirements," above, for the specific related field requirements.

Musicology/Music Theory Component

1. Musicology. 6 hours: specific courses (6000-level) to be determined in consultation with the major professor.

2. Music Theory. 6 hours: specific courses (5000- to 6000-level) to be determined in consultation with the major professor.

Electives (2 hours)

Choose from any field in music or outside of music. Two credits at the 5000 level may be applied to the category.

*Additional Requirements for Specialization in Woodwinds

If a student chooses a major in woodwinds instead of a major in a single woodwind instrument, the requirements are 12 hours in the principal instrument, 6 hours in two other instruments and 4 hours in the two remaining instruments, for a total of 22 hours in performance.

Major Field in Performance (Conducting)

Last 60 Hours of Study

1. Advanced conducting, applied conducting, and/or score reading and interpretation (enrollment in one of the above is required every semester in residence, maximum of 12 hours)

2. Choral Literature/Symphonic Literature/Wind Literature, 6 hours (6 required in major area, 3 additional recommended).

3. Dissertation: 12 hours, the written documentation should be at a level acceptable for juried publication. Conductors can receive dissertation credit for concerts conducted in the first semester of residence, if approved by the major professor and the DMA committee. Recital requirements can be fulfilled by compiling numerous appearances on video tape throughout the candidate's residency, or by giving full-length concerts as approved by the major professor. Choose one of the following:

Option I: 3 recitals (3 credits each); 1 lecture-recital (50-60 minutes/3 credits); and performance and critical essay (25 page minimum);

Option II: 3 recitals (3 credits each); 1 lecture (50-60 minutes/3 credits); and thesis (30 page minimum); or

Option III: 3 recitals (3 credits each); 1 written project (3 credits); and doctoral document (100 page minimum)

Related Field, 12 Hours

Choose from one of the following areas of study: accompanying, composition, jazz studies, music education, music theory, musicology or performance. Specific graduate courses to be determined in consultation with the chair of the related area. See "Related Field Course Requirements," above, for the specific related field requirements.

Musicology/Music Theory Component

1. Musicology. 6 hours, specific courses (6000-level) to be determined in consultation with the major professor.

2. Music Theory. 6 hours, specific courses (5000- to 6000-level) to be determined in consultation with the major professor.

Electives (6 hours)

Choose from any field in music or outside of music. Six credits at the 5000 level may be applied to the category. Courses taken to fulfill the requirement need not be limited to one area of study.

Major Field in Composition (General Program)

Last 60 Hours of Study

1. Composition, 15 hours: MUCP 6100 (9 hours);

6 hours selected from MUCP 6100, 6130, or 6140 (may not be taken concurrently).

2. Computer music, 6 hours: selected from MUCP 5590, 5680, 5690, 5700 and 5710.

3. Dissertation, 12 hours: the dissertation consists of two parts, (a) an original composition of appropriate scope, quality, and originality and (b) a critical essay on the original composition; the content of the dissertation will be determined in consultation with the major adviser.

Other Required Studies

1. Analysis and Techniques. 6 hours: selected from MUTH 5370, 5400, 6690; MUCP 6150 or 6410.

2. History and Literature. 6 hours: selected from MUMH 5050, 5070, 5150, 6020, 6030, 6160, 6740, 6750, 6760 or 6770.

Related/Minor Field, 12 hours

Option I: selected from one of the following related areas of study: accompanying, conducting, jazz studies, music education, music theory, musicology, or performance.

Option II: selected a minor field outside of music (e.g., computer science, art history). It is recommended that the minor field of study be selected in consultation with the major professor and the student's advisory committee.

Electives, 3 hours

Choose from any field in music or outside of music. Three credits at the 5000-level may be applied to the category.

Additional Requirements

Candidates for the degree in composition will be expected to arrange regular performances of their works and maintain a record of all works and performances. This record will be reviewed by the composition faculty and, when necessary, recommendations will be made for additional performances or works to be completed.

Major Field in Composition (Specialization Program)

Last 60 Hours of Study

1. Computer music, 15 hours. 9 hours selected from MUCP 5590, 5680, 5690, 5700 or 5710; MUCP 6110 and 6120 (3 hours each).

2. Composition, 6 hours; MUCP 6100.

3. Dissertation, 12 hours, the dissertation consists of three parts: (a) an original composition of appropriate scope, quality and originality, which includes a significant computer music or intermedia component; documentation may include a score, software, program code, audio, and/or video recordings; (b) a critical essay on the original composition; (c) a public performance of the complete work. The content of the dissertation will be determined in consultation with the major adviser.

Other Required Studies

1. Analysis and Techniques. 6 hours, selected from MUTH 5370, 5400, 6690; MUCP 6150 or 6410.

2. History and Literature. 6 hours, selected from MUMH 5050, 5070, 5150, 6020, 6030, 6160, 6740, 6750, 6760 or 6770.

Related/Minor Field, 12 hours

Option I: selected from one of the following related areas of study: accompanying, conducting, jazz studies, music education, music theory, musicology, or performance.

Option II: selected a minor field outside of music (e.g., computer science, art history). It is recommended that the minor field of study be selected in consultation with the major professor and the student's advisory committee.

Electives, 6 hours

Choose from any field in music or outside of music. Six credits at the 5000 level may be applied to the category.

Additional Requirements

Candidates for the degree in composition will be expected to arrange regular performances of their works and to maintain a record of all works and performances. This record will be reviewed by the composition faculty and, when necessary, recommendations will be made for additional performances or works to be completed.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy degree with a major in musicology, composition or theory requires a minimum of 90 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree. Of these 90 hours, at least 60 must be taken at UNT. Thirty hours may be transferred from other institutions at the discretion of the PhD committee of the College of Music. A master's degree from an accredited institution usually is accepted for the first 30 hours. The minimum residence requirement consists of two consecutive long semesters (fall and the following spring, or spring and the following fall) with a minimum load of 9 hours each semester.

It should be understood that the Doctor of Philosophy degree cannot be earned by routine work alone, regardless of accuracy or amount. The degree will be conferred, rather, on the basis of mastery of the field of music as a whole and of proven ability either to plan and carry out an original investigation (in musicology or theory) or to do creative work (in composition) with distinction.

Degree Requirements

In addition to course requirements (see below), each applicant for the Doctor of Philosophy degree must meet the following requirements.

Language Requirements

Proficiency in two languages, usually French and German, is required. Substitution of another language must be approved by the PhD committee. These requirements may be satisfied in one of the following ways.

1. Passing the UNT Reading Proficiency Examination (a two-semester accelerated course to prepare students for this examination is offered by the language department).

2. Two years of a foreign language with at least a B average for all four semesters. Those opting to satisfy the language requirement in this way must complete the course work no earlier than three years prior to enrollment in the program and no later than the semester prior to attempting the qualifying examinations.

Music History and Theory Lecture Series Attendance

Each graduate student with a declared major in musicology or music theory is expected to attend all lectures presented in the Division of Music History and Theory Lecture Series during each long semester of full-time enrollment (9 hours).

Pre-Qualifying Examinations

A keyboard examination and a contrapuntal problem examination must be taken and passed by the applicant before taking the qualifying examination.

1. The keyboard examination includes reading from open score (e.g., string quartet). It must be taken at the time of the first registration and may be retaken no more than two times. In lieu of taking the examination, the applicant may take the course MUTH 5110 (Score Reading at the Keyboard) with a grade of B or better.

2. The contrapuntal problem examination must be taken and passed before taking the qualifying examination. It may be taken no more than three times. In lieu of taking the examination, the applicant may take the counterpoint course, MUTH 5400, with a grade of B or better.

Qualifying Examination

The qualifying examination is a general review covering all fields of music study, with particular emphasis on the student's major field. The examination may not be taken until the language and pre-qualifying examination requirements are satisfied, or before all course deficiencies have been removed. Qualifying examinations are administered in November and March of each year.

Candidates should be prepared to spend three full days on the written examination outlined below. An oral examination is subsequently scheduled.

1. The first two days will be devoted to examination in the student's major field.

2. The third day will be devoted to general field examinations for all candidates, and will include the following:

a. music history for theory and composition majors, 3 hours;

b. analysis for musicology majors, 3 hours; and

c. special field examination, 3 hours.

The qualifying examination may be taken no more than three times.

Dissertation

The culmination of the doctoral work is a dissertation (or composition) of appropriate scope, quality and originality. The topic will be presented to the PhD committee of the College of Music after successful completion of the qualifying examination. At this time, upon being admitted to candidacy, the student must maintain continuous dissertation enrollment (MUGC 6950) each long semester until the dissertation has been completed and accepted by the graduate dean. Registration in at least one summer session is required if the student is using university facilities and/or faculty time during that summer session. The final copies of the dissertation must be placed in the hands of the major professor at least two weeks before the scheduled oral examination in any given semester. The oral examination will be scheduled after the dissertation has been completed and accepted by the major professor, and before the last day for filing dissertations in the office of the graduate dean, as announced in the Academic Calendar.

Final Oral Comprehensive Examination

The final oral comprehensive examination is administered after the dissertation or composition has been completed and accepted, and includes the following.

1. General bibliography (principal books and periodicals in the main field of music).

2. Music (familiarity with the principal classics in chamber music, orchestral, piano and vocal repertoire, including solo, opera, oratorio and choral music).

3. The special field(s) or the dissertation to include:

a. the special bibliography of these fields; and

b. questions on the candidate's information derived from sources in the requisite foreign languages.

The final oral examination may be taken no more than three times.

Major in Musicology

Admission to the degree program occurs in two steps: (1) acceptance into the doctoral program in musicology and permission to enroll in course work; and (2) admission to doctoral candidacy.

Acceptance and Permission to Enroll

To obtain permission to enroll in course work, the student must:

a. Apply for admission to UNT through the graduate school (an evaluation of the student's transcripts will determine deficiencies in course work);

b. Submit an acceptable score on the general aptitude test (verbal and quantitative) of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE);

c. Attend all orientation sessions scheduled by the director of graduate studies in music;

d. Take the Graduate Placement Examination (GPE) given by the College of Music; and

e. Complete the appropriate deficiency courses the first semester they are offered.

Application for acceptance into the doctoral program is made by a letter submitted to the coordinator of musicology. The following supplementary materials should accompany this letter:

a. An academic resume;

b. Three letters of recommendation by persons who know the applicant personally, professionally and academically; and

c. A portfolio that provides evidence of professional activity.

Upon completion of 12 hours in the doctoral program in musicology, the student will select a major professor and a doctoral (dissertation) committee under whose counsel a degree plan is devised and submitted to the graduate school.

Admission to Doctoral Candidacy

To obtain admission to doctoral candidacy in musicology, the student must pass qualifying examinations. These examinations seek to confirm that the student has a broad knowledge in and about the fields of musicology and music theory, and in-depth knowledge in and about selected areas within those fields. Specific policies and procedures related to the qualifying examinations are the responsibility of the College of Music PhD committee.

Evidence of Satisfactory Progress

Students must maintain a minimum overall B average and must have no grade lower than B in courses in the major field. Students not meeting this standard will be placed on probation. Students not fulfilling the conditions of probation may be dismissed from the program.

The Dissertation Defense

The dissertation defense is a hearing during which the candidate will summarize and defend the completed dissertation before the doctoral committee and any other interested faculty, students and members of the academic community. The successful defense is indicated by the signatures of all members of the doctoral committee.

Last 60 Hours of Study

Major in Composition

Application Procedures

1. The applicant for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy program in composition will submit the following to the director of graduate studies in music:

a. scores and recordings (CD or cassette) of three representative works;

b. professional resume;

c. complete list of original works and performances;

d. complete academic transcripts (photocopies acceptable);

e. official GRE scores (photocopies acceptable);

f. letters of recommendation from three persons qualified to evaluate the applicant's accomplishments and merits and to recommend advanced study;

g. writing sample (e.g., research paper, thesis, etc.); and

e. statement of purpose.

These materials must be received in the Office of Graduate Studies of the College of Music by the spring deadline for consideration for the following academic year.

2. Selected applicants will be interviewed by telephone or asked to audition in person prior to acceptance.

Last 60 Hours of Study

Students are required to select a related field in theory, musicology, performance or jazz studies, as prescribed by those fields of study, or select a minor field, such as computer science, 12 hours.

Composition majors may not have concurrent enrollment in MUCP 6100, 6130, 6140 or MUGC 6950.

Candidates for the degree in composition will be expected to arrange for performances of their works and to maintain a record of works completed and performed. This record will be reviewed by the composition faculty and, when necessary, recommendations will be made for additional performances or works to be completed.

Major in Theory

This curriculum provides opportunities for students to engage in study that will prepare them for professional careers in theoretical research and in teaching. Students are required to engage in considerable research activity in the seminar environment, as well as to develop the pedagogical skills necessary to communicate results of that research.

Admission to the degree program occurs in three steps: (1) permission to enroll in course work; (2) acceptance into the doctoral program in music theory; and (3) admission to doctoral candidacy.

Permission to Enroll in Course Work

To obtain permission to enroll in course work, the student must:

1. apply for admission to UNT through the graduate school (an evaluation of the student's transcript will determine deficiencies in course work);

2. submit an acceptable score on the general aptitude test (verbal and quantitative) of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE);

3. take the GRE subject (advanced) test in music;

4. attend all orientation sessions scheduled by the director of graduate studies in music;

5. take the Graduate Placement Examination (GPE) given by the College of Music; and

6. complete the appropriate deficiency courses the first semester they are offered.

Acceptance into the Doctoral Program

To be accepted into the doctoral program in music theory, the student must have completed the following:

1. all deficiency courses;

2. twelve hours of 5000- and/or 6000-level music theory and/or musicology courses;

3. the PhD keyboard examination; and

4. the PhD language requirement.

Application for acceptance into the doctoral program is made by a letter submitted to the coordinator of music theory. The following supplementary materials should accompany this letter:

1. an academic resume;

2. three letters of recommendation by persons who know the applicant personally, professionally and academically; and

3. a portfolio that provides evidence of professional activity.

Upon acceptance into the doctoral program in music theory, the student will select a major professor and a doctoral (dissertation) committee under whose counsel a degree plan is devised and submitted to the graduate school.

Admission to Doctoral Candidacy

To obtain admission to doctoral candidacy in music theory, the student must pass qualifying examinations. These examinations seek to confirm that the student has a broad knowledge in and about the fields of music theory and musicology, and in-depth knowledge in and about selected areas within those fields. Specific policies and procedures related to the qualifying examinations are the responsibility of the College of Music PhD committee.

Evidence of Satisfactory Progress

Students must maintain a minimum overall B average and must have no grade lower than B in courses in the major field. Students not meeting this standard will be placed on probation. Students not fulfilling the conditions of probation may be dismissed from the program.

The Dissertation Defense

The dissertation defense is a hearing during which the candidate will present a one-hour lecture and defend the completed dissertation before the doctoral committee and any other interested faculty, students and members of the academic community. The successful defense is indicated by the signatures of all members of the doctoral committee.

Last 60 Hours of Study

Elective credits may be used to establish a minor or related field if the student so desires. Nine credit hours of electives must have a direct bearing on the dissertation topic. If degree credit is to be given for applied music, the student must pass the master's-level entrance audition in performance prior to enrollment for these credit hours. The student who does not pass, or take, the audition may study applied music, but this credit will not count toward the 60 hours required for the degree.

Doctor of Philosophy in Music Education

The Doctor of Philosophy in music education degree is an individualized, research-oriented program that allows for optional emphasis in a number of areas of specialization within music education. The degree is offered by the Federation of North Texas Area Universities and conferred by UNT, with the other participating institutions offering appropriate staff, courses, equipment and libraries.

Degree Requirements

The program for the degree includes a minimum of 60 hours in addition to the master's degree, or its equivalent, or at least 90 hours beyond the bachelor's degree.

For a complete description of the program, including areas of specialization, admission and acceptance procedures, course deficiencies, tool requirements, qualifying examinations and dissertation requirements, please consult the Bulletin for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Music Education, available through the graduate office of the College of Music or through the chair of the music education graduate committee.

Course Requirements

Beyond the fulfillment of declared deficiencies in course work and of tool requirements, minimum course requirements for the 60-hour program are as follows.

Required, 8 Hours

1. MUED 6480, Doctoral Seminar in Music Education, two semesters, 1 hour each.

2. MUED 6440, Systematic Measurement of Music Behaviors, 3 hours.

3. MUED 6520, Analysis and Criticism of Research Studies, 3 hours.

Selected Courses, 15 Hours

Select 15 hours from the following:

Electives, 25 Hours

May include private lessons and participation in performance organizations. One course of the three tool requirements may be counted toward the electives.

Dissertation, 12 Hours

The student must complete 12 hours in MUGC 6950, Dissertation.

Special Program Requirements

Acceptance into the Degree Program

Note: Admission requirements were being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies or the program for current admission requirements, or see information posted on the graduate school web site (www.tsgs.unt.edu).

Acceptance into the degree program occurs in three steps: (1) permission to enroll in course work; (2) acceptance into the doctoral program in music education; and (3) admission to doctoral candidacy at UNT.

To obtain permission to enroll in course work, the student must:

1. apply for admission to UNT through the School of Graduate Studies (an evaluation of the student's transcript will determine deficiencies in course work); and

2. submit an acceptable score on the general aptitude test (verbal and quantitative) of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

After arriving on campus for the first semester's work, the student must:

1. attend all orientation sessions scheduled by the director of graduate studies in music;

2. take the Graduate Placement Examination (GPE) given by the College of Music; and

3. enroll in at least 4 hours of courses in music education.

To be accepted into the doctoral program in music education, the student must have taken a minimum of 12 hours of music education courses. The application for acceptance is directed to the chair of the music education graduate committee and should contain:

1. a cover letter, and

2. an academic resume.

In making the acceptance decision, the music education graduate committee will take all available information about the student under advisement. Success in course work alone does not guarantee acceptance to the program.

Upon acceptance to the doctoral program in music education, the student will choose a doctoral (dissertation) committee under whose counsel a degree plan is devised and submitted to the School of Graduate Studies. The qualifying examinations cannot be taken unless the approved degree plan is on file in the School of Graduate Studies.

Residence

A doctoral student is officially in residence when carrying at least 9 hours of course work in each of two consecutive long semesters.

Students who acquire residency toward another doctorate in the College of Music may, with the approval of the music education graduate committee, receive favorable consideration for residency in music education. Each case will be considered on an individual basis.

Teaching Experience

A record of three years of successful teaching experience is required before the doctoral degree can be conferred. It is highly recommended that this experience be gained at the public school level before the student has completed all course work.

Tool Requirements

Of 9 hours of tool requirements, 6 hours must be in advanced behavioral statistics and should be completed prior to taking the qualifying examinations. The remaining 3 hours may count toward the electives and should be completed prior to the dissertation proposal defense.

Demonstration of Professional Activity

Either prior to or shortly after the qualifying examinations, the student must demonstrate specific teaching, scholarly, and/or performance skills within a chosen area of specialization. This demonstration may consist of a workshop/clinic on a given subject, one or more articles in referred journals, books published by other than self, a recital of at least 30 minutes in length or the rehearsal of an ensemble.

Qualifying Examinations

To obtain admission to doctoral candidacy at UNT, the student will take the qualifying examinations upon the completion of most of the course work. The examinations seek to confirm that the student has:

1. a broad knowledge in and about the field of music education as defined in the Bulletin for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Music Education, and

2. in-depth knowledge in and about selected areas within that field.

All examinations seek to assess the prospective candidate's ability (a) to organize facts and content knowledge into meaningful information; (b) to generalize from, draw conclusions about and interpret that information; and (c) to speak and write in the exacting style of the scholar.

The examinations are usually given in November, March and June. The student must pass at least 50 percent of the examinations (B minus or better). If less than 50 percent is passed, all portions of the examination must be retaken; if more than 50 percent is passed, only those portions must be repeated in which the student scored below B minus. No more than two repeats are allowed. Oral examinations may be requested by the music education graduate committee in cases for which a repeat of the written examinations is not feasible.

Dissertation

After the successful completion of all portions of the qualifying examinations, and upon being admitted to candidacy by the dean of the School of Graduate Studies, the student must maintain continuous enrollment in MUGC 6950 each long semester until the dissertation has been completed, defended and accepted by the graduate dean.

The dissertation process is divided into two steps:

1. preparing and defending the dissertation proposal; and

2. writing and defending the dissertation.

The Proposal and Its Defense

The proposal is a public hearing during which the candidate presents to the doctoral committee in writing the purpose, research questions and proposed methodology of the dissertation. The proposal serves as a structural model for the dissertation itself and usually will be from 30 to 50 pages in length.

The Dissertation Defense and Final Steps in Completing All Requirements

The dissertation defense is a public hearing during which the candidate will defend the completed dissertation before the doctoral committee and any other interested students, faculty and members of the community. The dissertation must follow the UNT rules for preparing theses.

The successful defense is indicated by the signatures of all members of the doctoral committee. The approved dissertation must be in the office of the dean of the College of Music at least a week before the deadline for filing theses and dissertations in the graduate office of the university. An abstract of the dissertation must be prepared and submitted with one original and two copies of the complete work to the School of Graduate Studies for final reading and approval.

Courses of Instruction

All Courses of Instruction are located in one section at the back of this catalog.

Course and Subject Guide

The "Course and Subject Guide," found in the Courses of Instruction section of this book, serves as a table of contents and provides quick access to subject areas and prefixes.

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