Department of Biological Sciences


Main Departmental Office
Biology Building, 210
P.O. Box 305220
Denton, TX 76203-5220
(940) 565-2011
Fax: (940) 565-3821
Web site: www.biol.unt.edu

Art J. Goven, Chair

Graduate Faculty: Beitinger, Benjamin, Burggren, Chapman, Dickson, Dickstein, Dzialowski, Fitzpatrick, Fuchs, Goven, Gross, Kennedy, Kunz, LaPoint, Norton, O'Donovan, Padilla, Pirtle, Root, Saleh, Schafer, Schwark, Sinclair, Smith, Tam, Waller, Zimmerman.

Mission

The Department of Biological Sciences provides contemporary education of the highest quality to students pursuing graduate degrees in four degree programs: biology, biochemistry, molecular biology and environmental science. Research, strong professor-student mentoring, high quality instruction and professional community service are the foundation of our mission.

Research

The cornerstone of our graduate programs is the creation of new knowledge through research. We offer students the opportunity to conduct research that leads to theses and dissertations in aquatic biology, aquatic toxicology, biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, ecology, environmental sciences, forensic biology, genetics, immunology, limnology, microbiology, neurobiology, physiology and plant sciences. Our research is supported through numerous sources that include the American Heart Association; Army Corps of Engineers; the Departments of Agriculture, Defense, and Education; the Environmental Protection Agency; the National Institutes of Health; the National Science Foundation; state agencies; private foundations and industry.

Department resources for research and graduate training occupy more than 200,000 square feet in the Biology Building, the Science Research Building and the Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building. Greenhouses, vehicles, watercraft and an aquatic research field station are also available.

Degree Programs in Biological Sciences

The department offers graduate programs leading to the following degrees:

Application and Admission to the Programs

Biology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Programs

1. Application materials and information about our faculty and programs may be obtained by contacting the graduate advising secretary or coordinator of graduate programs at (940) 565-3593 or from our web site (www.biol.unt.edu ). Prospective applicants meeting our admission criteria are encouraged to become familiar with the research and degree programs within the department and to seek opportunities by contacting individual faculty members or the coordinator of graduate programs in biology, biochemistry and molecular biology.

2. Applicants must first apply and be admitted to the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies to be considered for admission to a degree program in biology, biochemistry or molecular biology. Applicants must also submit the following directly to the department:

a. a departmental application form;

b. a letter of intent, including the specific program and degree sought (MA, MS or PhD); faculty member contacted as prospective major adviser; professional goals and objectives; the reason for choosing UNT, the
Department of Biological Sciences and the specific area of interest; and

c. three form-letters of recommendation from former professors if a recent graduate. One letter may be from an employer if employed for more than one year since graduation.

3. Completed applications meeting departmental acceptance criteria are reviewed by the faculty. Only applicants selected by a faculty member who agrees to act as the student's academic adviser, i.e. major professor, are eligible for admission to a graduate program in biology, biochemistry or molecular biology.

4. Application deadlines: completed applications must be received in the department on or before the following dates. We encourage applications at least three months prior to anticipated enrollment.

5. Departmental acceptance criteria.

a. Master's Degree (MA/MS):

Provisional admission of applicants not meeting all of the criteria, except for the requirement for a major professor, may be considered at the discretion of the department. Provisionally accepted students must satisfy all admission provisions within the time designated by the department at the time of admission or will be dropped from the program.

b. Doctoral Degree (PhD):

There is no provisional admission to the PhD program.

Environmental Science Programs

1. Application materials and information on the environmental science program and faculty may be obtained by contacting the graduate coordinator of the environmental science program at (940) 565-2694 or from our web site (www.biol.unt.edu). Prospective applicants meeting our admission criteria are encouraged to become familiar with the research and degree programs within the department and to seek opportunities by contacting individual faculty members or the graduate coordinator of the environmental science program.

2. Applicants must first apply and be admitted to the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies to be considered for admission to a degree program in environmental science. Applicants must also submit the following directly to the graduate coordinator of the environmental science program:

a. a program application form;

b. a letter of intent, including the specific program and degree sought (MS or PhD); faculty member contacted as prospective major professor; professional goals and objectives; the reason for choosing UNT, the environmental science program and the specific area of interest; and

c. three form-letters of recommendation from former professors if a recent graduate. One letter may be from an employer if employed for more than one year since graduation.

3. Completed applications meeting acceptance criteria are reviewed by the environmental science program's Graduate Acceptance Committee, which determines acceptance to the environmental science program.

4. Application deadlines: completed applications must be received in the department on or before the following dates. We encourage applications at least three months prior to anticipated enrollment.

5. Environmental science program acceptance criteria.

a. Master's Degree (MA/MS):

b. Doctoral Degree (PhD):

Degree Programs in the Biological Sciences

Biology Program

The biology program provides students the option of selecting a research track leading to the Master of Science (MS) or Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in biology, or a non-research track leading to the Master of Arts (MA) in biology. Students interested in obtaining both a masters degree and certification to teach life sciences at the secondary level may select the non-research Master of Science in biology: teaching in the life sciences. Students pursuing a research degree have the opportunity to conduct research leading to a thesis or dissertation in a variety of specializations, including aquatic biology, ecology, forensic biology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, neurobiology, physiology and plant biology. Visit www.biol.unt.edu for research interests of the faculty. Information on degree requirements follows the program descriptions.

Degrees in Biology

Biochemistry Program

The biochemistry program offers research degrees at the master's and doctoral levels with opportunities for research that reflects the broad nature of the discipline, including regulation of microbial and plant metabolism, regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression and regulation of protein-protein interactions. Current research projects in biochemistry include plant gene structure, organization and expression; development responses of organisms to oxygen deprivation; cell and molecular biology of prokaryotic cyanide metabolism; linkage analyses of mammalian and avian genomes; the molecular biology of prokaryotic ATCase; regulation of phospholipid metabolism and membrane biosynthesis in plants; mechano-chemical energy transduction of molecular motors using biochemical and biophysical methodologies; and investigations of the organization and interaction of macromolecular structures including nebulin, actin and myosin. Visit www.biol.unt.edu for more information on the research interests of the biochemistry program faculty (professors Benjamin, Chapman, Dickstein, Kunz, Norton, O'Donovan, Padilla, Pirtle and Root). Information on degree requirements follows the program descriptions.

Degrees in Biochemistry

* Biochemistry Graduate Core Courses: BIOC 5540 and 5550, or the equivalents, are prerequisites for the core courses. Three of the following are required for the MS and four for the PhD: BIOC 5340 or 6600 (only one may count as a core course), 6610 (may substitute BIOC 6650 with committee approval), 6620, 6630 and 6640.

Molecular Biology Program

The molecular biology program leading to the PhD degree is offered through the Federation of North Texas Area Universities to students enrolled at UNT or Texas Woman's University (TWU). Students enrolled through either UNT or TWU have the opportunity to take courses, participate in seminars and conferences, and conduct research at both universities. Research opportunities at UNT include pyrimidine metabolism in bacteria; Pseudomonas ATCase; mechanisms of natural transformation in Gram-negative bacteria; organization and evolution of Pseudomonas catabolic plasmids; role of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the regulation of glycogenolysis; cyanide biodegradation; chemistry and enzymology of pathways for catabolism of aromatic compounds in soil microorganisms; brain-stem lipids; mammalian and plant gene structure, organization and expression; and regulations of blood cell differentiation. Research opportunities at TWU include binding and transport in cell membranes, gene regulation and hormone action, glycoprotein synthesis and secretion, functions of estrogen compounds in plants, biology of retroviruses, bacterial conjugation and gene transfer, aspects of brain development and brain function, and mechanisms of generating motor patterns. Visit the web sites at www.biol.unt.edu for research interests of the UNT faculty (professors Benjamin, Chapman, Dickstein, Fuchs, Gross, Kunz, Norton, O'Donovan, Pirtle, Root, Schwark, Tam and Zimmerman) and www.twu.edu/as/bio for the research interests of the TWU faculty (professors Conrad-Webb, Knesek, Maier, McIntire, Mills, Rudick and Uphouse). Applications are considered for the molecular biology program only after meeting the admission requirements either of the Robert B. Toulouse School of Graduate Studies and the Department of Biological Sciences at UNT or the Graduate School and Department of Biology at TWU. Information on degree requirements at UNT follows the program descriptions.

Degrees in Molecular Biology

Environmental Science Program

The environmental science program is an interdisciplinary collaboration among the Department of Biological Sciences, the Department of Geography, the Department of Chemistry, the Department of Philosophy and Religion Studies and other departments at UNT. The program offers graduate studies in environmental science that lead to the MS and PhD. The course of study, involving both core and elective courses, is designed to accommodate students with various backgrounds and interests in the natural, physical and social sciences who desire careers related to environmental science. Students are trained to identify problems, collect and interpret data, and develop solutions to complex and challenging environmental problems facing municipalities, industries, utilities and government agencies.

Faculty in the Department of Biological Sciences regularly participating in the environmental science program (professors Beitinger, Dickson, Fitzpatrick, Kennedy, La Point, Saleh, Waller and Zimmerman) are active in a diversity of research areas including aquatic biology, analytical chemistry, aquatic and terrestrial toxicology, ecology, ecophysiology, limnology, remote sensing and land use analyses, and environmental modeling. Visit www.biol.unt.edu or www.ias.unt.edu for more information on the research interests of the environmental science program faculty. Information on degree requirements follows the program descriptions.

Degrees in Environmental Science

Degree Requirements and Procedures

Biology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Programs

Master's Degree

1. The student and major professor decide whether the student pursues the master of science (MS: thesis), Master of Science with a major in biology: teaching in the life sciences (MS: non-thesis) or Master of Arts (MA: problems-in-lieu-of-thesis or course work only). The MA and MS with a major in biology: teaching in the life sciences are considered terminal degrees in the Department of Biological Sciences, which means that the student completing a non-thesis degree is ineligible for the department's doctoral program.

2. During the first long semester, the student and major professor select an advisory committee of two or more other faculty members. If a person outside of UNT (except for members of the Federation of North Texas Area Universities) is selected, that person should submit a letter to the department chair agreeing to serve on the committee, along with a curriculum vitae. All contacts with committee members outside the department are made by the student or major professor. A copy of the form designating the committee must be filed with the graduate advising secretary before the student's second long semester. Students in the MS in biology: teaching in the life sciences are advised by the standing Teaching in the Life Sciences Program Selection Committee.

3. Before registering for the second long semester, the student, major professor and advisory committee formulate a degree plan of the courses to be taken by the student, including core course requirements and deficiency work. Research MS students must take a minimum of 24 hours of formal courses, special problems and seminars, plus 6 hours of thesis. Students in the MS in biology: teaching in the life sciences must take 18 hours of biology courses, including BIOL 5260, 5830 and 6150, plus 18 hours in secondary education (EDSE 5002, 5004, 5105, 5130 and 5470). Students in the MA course work-only option must take a minimum of 36 hours of formal 5000-6000 level courses. Students in the MA problems-in-lieu-of-thesis
option must take 30 hours of formal courses plus 6 hours of problems-in-lieu-of-thesis. The MA has a language requirement. Only 6 hours of special problems (5900/5910) may be applied to the research MS degree program. A copy of the degree plan, signed by all committee members, must be filed with the graduate advising secretary before the beginning of the student's second long semester. All course work must be at the 5000 and 6000 levels. Students pursuing the MA or MS may not receive graduate credit for any course below the 4000 level by taking the course under a 5000-level designation, such as special problems. Undergraduate courses, except those cross listed as graduate courses, are considered to be deficiencies.

4. Before registering for the third long semester, students on a thesis or problems-in-lieu-of-thesis track should submit a formal research proposal to the major professor and advisory committee for approval. Students may not register for thesis (5950) or problems-in-lieu-of-thesis (5920/5930) until an approved research proposal is filed with the graduate advising secretary.

5. After the approved research proposal is filed, the student may register for thesis or problems-in-lieu-of-thesis hours. Once registered for thesis, but not problems-in-lieu-of-thesis, the student must maintain continuous enrollment in at least 3 hours of 5950 during each long semester until the thesis is submitted to the graduate school. Failure to maintain continuous enrollment may invalidate previous thesis credit or result in the student being dropped from the degree program, unless granted an official leave of absence by the dean of the Robert B. Toulouse School of Graduate Studies. If the student uses university facilities or faculty time or both during one or both summer semesters, the student must also enroll for a minimum of 3 hours of 5950 during the summer.

6. Following approval by the major professor, a draft of the completed thesis or problems-in-lieu-of-thesis must be submitted to the committee at least two weeks prior to its defense and final examination.

7. A formal public seminar based on the thesis must be presented by the student to the department (students pursuing a problems-in-lieu-of-thesis present only to their committee) during the student's final semester. The student must contact the graduate advising secretary [Biology Building, Room 210, (940) 565-3593] to schedule a room for the seminar and defense.

8. Directly following the seminar, the student defends the thesis in a final oral examination conducted by the major professor and advisory committee.

9. Students in the MA 36-hour course work option must take a final comprehensive oral examination given by the adviser and advisory committee during the final semester. Students in the MA problems-in-lieu-of-thesis option must take their final examination during presentation of the problems-in-lieu-of-thesis to the faculty adviser and advisory committee in the final semester. Students in the MS in biology: teaching in the life sciences must take a final oral comprehensive examination given during the final semester.

10. The student is responsible for completing all requirements and meeting all deadlines for graduation within the time specified by the graduate school.

11. A final copy of the student's thesis or problems-in-lieu-of-thesis must be submitted to the Department of Biological Sciences main office, either bound or on disk in .pdf format.

Doctoral Degree

1. During the second long semester, the student and major professor select an advisory committee of four or more other faculty members. If a person outside of UNT (except for members of the Federation of North Texas Area Universities) is selected as a committee member, that person should submit a letter to the department chair agreeing to serve on the committee, along with a curriculum vitae. All contacts with committee members outside the department are made by the student or major professor. A copy of the form designating the committee must be filed with the graduate advising secretary before the student's third long semester.

2. Before registering for the third long semester, the student, major professor and advisory committee prepare a formal degree plan of the courses to be taken by the student, including any core courses (and language or tool subject requirement). The degree plan consists of 60 hours for students with an approved master's degree, or 90 hours for students with only a bachelor's degree, plus 12 hours of dissertation. Only 6 hours of special problems (6900/6910) and 12 hours of individual research (6940) may be counted toward the degree. A copy of the degree plan, signed by all committee members, must be submitted to the graduate advising secretary before the student's third long semester. All course work must be at the 5000 and 6000 levels. Doctoral students may not receive graduate credit for any undergraduate course by taking the course under a 5000-6000 level designation, such as special problems. Undergraduate courses, except those cross listed as graduate courses, are considered to be deficiencies.

3. Students must satisfy the Robert B. Toulouse School of Graduate Studies' language requirement or, in lieu of a foreign language, students may complete 6 hours of acceptable tool subject courses specified by the major professor and the advisory committee. Exceptions to this requirement may be made for students whose native language is not English.

4. Students who filed degree plans prior to 1996 were required to select, in consultation with the major professor, a UNT faculty member from outside the department to serve as a university committee member. Students filing a degree plan after 1996 are not required but may choose to have an external UNT committee member. It is the responsibility of the student and major professor to make all contacts with the external committee member.

5. Before registering for the fifth long semester, a formal research proposal should be submitted to the major professor and advisory committee for approval. Students may not register for dissertation (6950) until the approved research proposal is filed with the graduate advising secretary.

6. Only following submission and approval of the research proposal may the student begin registering for dissertation hours. Once registered for dissertation, the student must maintain continuous enrollment in at least 3 hours of 6950 during each long semester until the dissertation is submitted to the graduate school. Failure to maintain continuous enrollment may invalidate previous 6950 credit or result in the student being dropped from the degree program, unless granted an official leave of absence by the dean of the Robert B. Toulouse School of Graduate Studies. If the student uses university facilities or faculty time or both during one or both summer semesters, the student must also enroll for a minimum of 3 hours of 6950 during the summer.

7. Doctoral students may take written and oral candidacy examinations only after completion of all of their degree plan course requirements. Oral examinations may be taken only after the student has passed all written examinations. Both examinations must be completed at least nine months prior to graduation. The manner and form of the written and oral candidacy examinations are determined by the major professor, who is chair of the student's advisory committee, and the committee members. The student must contact the graduate advising secretary [Biology Building, Room 210, (940) 565-3593] to schedule a room for the examinations. The committee members should send all written examinations to the graduate advising secretary at least one day prior to the scheduled date of the examination. The examining professor sets guidelines for administration of written examinations and must notify the graduate advising secretary of any special instructions.

8. Following approval by the major professor, a draft of the dissertation must be submitted to the committee at least two weeks prior to the defense of the dissertation and final examination.

9. A formal seminar based on the dissertation must be presented by the student during the student's final semester. The student must contact the graduate advising secretary [Biology Building, Room 210 or at (940) 565-3593] to schedule a room for the seminar and defense.

10. Directly following the seminar, the student defends the dissertation in a final oral examination conducted by the major professor and advisory committee.

11. The student is responsible for completing all requirements and meeting all deadlines for graduation within the time specified by the graduate school.

12. A final copy of the student's dissertation must be submitted to the Department of Biological Sciences main office either bound or on disk in .pdf format.

Environmental Science Program

Master's Degree

1. The student and major professor decide whether the student pursues the master of science thesis or non-thesis course work option. The non-thesis MS is considered a terminal degree in the Department of Biological Sciences, which means that the student completing a non-thesis degree is ineligible for the department's doctoral program.

2. During the first long semester, the student and major professor select an advisory committee of two or more other faculty members. If a person outside of UNT (except for members of the Federation of North Texas Area Universities) is selected, that person should submit a letter to the department chair agreeing to serve on the committee, along with a curriculum vitae. All contacts with committee members outside the department are made by the student or major professor. A copy of the form designating the committee must be filed with the graduate advising secretary (Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, Room 215) before the student's second long semester.

3. Before registering for the second long semester, the student, major professor and advisory committee formulate a degree plan of the courses to be taken by the student, including core course requirements and deficiency work. Research MS students must take a minimum of 36 hours of formal courses, special problems and seminars, plus 6 hours of thesis. Students in the MS non-thesis option must take a minimum of 42 hours of formal 5000-6000 level courses. Only 6 hours of special problems (5900/5910) may be applied to the research MS degree program. A copy of the degree plan, signed by all committee members, must be filed with the environmental science graduate advising secretary (Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, Room 215) before the beginning of the student's second long semester. All course work must be at the 5000 and 6000 levels. Students pursuing the MS may not receive graduate credit for any course below the 4000 level by taking the course under a 5000-level designation, such as special problems. Undergraduate courses, except those cross listed as graduate courses, are considered to be deficiencies.

4. Before registering for the third long semester, students on a thesis track should submit a formal research proposal to the major professor and advisory committee for approval. Students may not register for thesis (5950) until an approved research proposal is filed with the environmental science graduate advising secretary (Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, Room 215).

5. After the approved research proposal is filed, the student may register for thesis hours. Once registered for thesis, the student must maintain continuous enrollment in at least 3 hours of 5950 during each long semester until the thesis is submitted to the graduate school. Failure to maintain continuous
enrollment may invalidate previous thesis credit or result in the student being dropped from the degree program, unless granted an official leave of absence by the dean of the Robert B. Toulouse School of Graduate Studies. If the student uses university facilities or faculty time or both during one or both summer semesters, the student must also enroll for a minimum of 3 hours of 5950 during the summer.

6. Following approval by the major professor, a draft of the completed thesis must be submitted to the committee at least two weeks prior to its defense and final examination.

7. A formal public seminar based on the thesis must be presented by the student to the department during the student's final semester. The student must contact the environmental science graduate advising secretary (Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, Room 215) to schedule a room for the seminar and defense.

8. Directly following the seminar, the student defends the thesis in a final oral examination conducted by the major professor and advisory committee.

9. Students in the MS non-thesis option must take a final comprehensive written and oral examination given by the major professor and advisory committee during the final semester.

10. The student is responsible for completing all requirements and meeting all deadlines for graduation within the time specified by the graduate school.

11. A final copy of the student's thesis must be submitted to the Department of Biological Sciences main office, either bound or on disk in .pdf format.

Doctoral Degree

1. During the second long semester, the student and major professor select an advisory committee of four or more other faculty members. If a person outside of UNT (except for members of the Federation of North Texas Area Universities) is selected as a committee member, that person should submit a letter to the department chair agreeing to serve on the committee, along with a curriculum vitae. All contacts with committee members outside the department are made by the student or major professor. A copy of the form designating the committee must be filed with the environmental science graduate advising secretary (Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, Room 215) before the student's third long semester.

2. Before registering for the third long semester, the student, major professor and advisory committee prepare a formal degree plan of the courses, including any core courses, and language or tool subject requirements. The degree plan consists of 60 hours for students with an approved master's degree, or 90 hours for students with only a bachelor's degree (both of these include 12 hours of dissertation). Only 6 hours of special problems (6900/6910) and 12 hours of individual research (6940) may be counted toward the degree. A copy of the degree plan, signed by all committee members, must be submitted to the environmental science graduate advising secretary (Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, Room 215) before the student's third long semester. All course work must be at the 5000 and 6000 levels. Doctoral students may not receive graduate credit for any undergraduate course by taking the course under a 5000-6000 level designation, such as special problems. Undergraduate courses, except those cross listed as graduate courses, are considered to be deficiencies.

3. Students must satisfy the Robert B. Toulouse School of Graduate Studies' language requirement or, in lieu of a foreign language, students may complete 6 hours of acceptable tool subject courses specified by the major professor and the advisory committee. Exceptions to this requirement may be made for students whose native language is not English.

4. Students who filed degree plans prior to 1996 were required to select, in consultation with the major professor, a UNT faculty member from outside the department to serve as a university committee member. Students filing a degree plan after 1996 are not required, but may choose to have an external UNT committee member. It is the responsibility of the student and major professor to make all contacts with the external committee member.

5. Before registering for the fifth long semester, a formal research proposal should be submitted to the major professor and advisory committee for approval. Students may not register for dissertation (6950) until the approved research proposal is filed with the environmental science graduate advising secretary (Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, Room 215).

6. Only following submission and approval of the research proposal may the student begin registering for dissertation hours. Once registered for dissertation, the student must maintain continuous enrollment in at least 3 hours of 6950 during each long semester until the dissertation is submitted to the graduate school. Failure to maintain continuous enrollment may invalidate previous 6950 credit or result in the student being dropped from the degree program, unless granted an official leave of absence by the dean of the Robert B. Toulouse School of Graduate Studies. If the student uses university facilities or faculty time or both during one or both summer semesters, the student must also enroll for a minimum of 3 hours of 6950 during the summer.

7. Doctoral students may take written and oral candidacy examinations only after completion of all of their degree plan course requirements. Oral examinations may be taken only after the student has passed all written examinations. Both examinations must be completed at least nine months prior to graduation. The manner and form of the written and oral candidacy examinations are determined by the major professor, who is chair of the student's advisory committee, and the committee members. The student must contact the
environmental science graduate advising secretary (Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, Room 215) to schedule a room for the examinations. The committee members should send all written examinations to the graduate advising secretary at least one day prior to the scheduled date of the examination. The examining professor sets guidelines for administration of written examinations and must notify the graduate advising secretary of any special instructions.

8. Following approval by the major professor, a draft of the dissertation must be submitted to the committee at least two weeks prior to the defense of the dissertation and final examination.

9. A formal seminar based on the dissertation must be presented by the student during the student's final semester. The student must contact the environmental science graduate advising secretary (Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, Room 215) to schedule a room for the seminar and defense.

10. Directly following the seminar, the student defends the dissertation in a final oral examination conducted by the major professor and advisory committee.

11. The student is responsible for completing all requirements and meeting all deadlines for graduation within the time specified by the graduate school.

12. A final copy of the student's dissertation must be submitted to the Department of Biological Sciences main office either bound or on disk in .pdf format.

Institute of Applied Sciences


Main Office
Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, 215
P.O. Box 310559
Denton, TX 76203-0559
(940) 565-2694
Web site: www.ias.unt.edu
E-mail: lapoint@unt.edu or cking@unt.edu

Thomas LaPoint, Director

The Institute of Applied Sciences (IAS) provides research and educational programs that address the natural and human resource issues facing Texas, the nation and the world. With an emphasis on water, land, people and communities, IAS seeks to explore resources for the future. The strength of IAS is its interdisciplinary approach to instruction, research and community service. The Institute is presently organized into four program areas: water resources, environmental chemistry, remote sensing and land use analysis, and archaeology. The institute provides educational programs for students seeking training in environmental studies and other applied science areas. It also offers continuing education programs such as workshops, mini-courses, seminars and symposia to the public.

Activities include basic and applied studies in a variety of fields in the applied sciences, including the analysis of trace organic and inorganic compounds in air, water, soils, waste materials and biological samples; toxicology; land use analysis via remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS); archaeological reconnaissance and salvage; and water resources management. The institute is particularly active in the coordination and execution of joint research projects with industry and governmental agencies in these areas. The following centers support this role.

Aquatic Toxicology and Reservoir Limnology

UNT has one of the best aquatic toxicology laboratories in the Southwest. The lab is equipped to conduct acute and chronic toxicity tests with freshwater and marine organisms, and conducts research for a variety of industries and municipalities on the effects of chemicals on aquatic life. The reservoir limnology program conducts water quality research on rivers and reservoirs throughout Texas.

Remote Sensing and Land Use Analyses

The Center for Remote Sensing (CRS) applies remote sensing technologies and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to land use and water resources issues. The center uses state-of-the-art computer facilities to conduct basic and applied research on remote sensing data collection, image enhancement, classification and analyses. The primary thrust is to find interrelationships between local or regional land use patterns and water quality. The center has a fully equipped Earth Resources Data Analysis Systems (ERDAS) and ARC/INFO capabilities.

Ecological Risk Assessment/Water Research Field Station

UNT has two of the few facilities in the U.S. designed to assess, under field conditions, the effects of new chemicals and pesticides on aquatic ecosystems prior to their use in the general environment. The Water Research Field Station (WRFS) consists of 48 aquatic testing ponds of 0.1 acre each and 52 1,000- and 10,000-liter microcosms. The Artificial Stream Facility has 12 replicate five-meter streams, each capable of being colonized by aquatic species. The WRFS is specifically designed to assess the impacts of agrichemicals on aquatic populations and communities. The field station and stream facility are supported on campus by a biological and residue analysis laboratory with state-of-the-art equipment.

Environmental Chemistry

The Environmental Chemistry Laboratory conducts research on the fate of chemicals in the environment using state-of-the-art equipment to analyze metals and organic chemicals in water and soils. The laboratory examines the physical and chemical processes that control the distribution of chemicals in soil, surface water, ground water and the atmosphere.

Environmental Archaeology and Geology

The institute's faculty are experienced in the design and implementation of cultural resource management projects. The emphasis is on reconstruction of past environments and cultural ecology as part of archaeological research. Quaternary geologic studies are supported by a sediment-soils laboratory that has full capabilities for mechanical, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples from archaeological sites and natural deposits. A comparative osteology lab maintains an extensive collection of animal skeletons for zooarchaeological research and forensic analysis. An off-campus lab includes facilities for artifact washing and cataloging, detailed analysis and artifact curation. Environmental geology, groundwater hydrology, geomorphology, soil science, sedimentology and hydrology research are also conducted.

Environmental Modeling

This laboratory develops and uses mathematical models and computer simulations for the assessment of risks and impacts of anthropogenic stressors on environmental and ecological systems. Research is carried out at local, landscape, regional and global scales. The main themes of the laboratory involve linking of environmental models to remote sensing, GIS and other advanced technology in order to understand landscape and regional dynamics; reveal global change effects on tropical forests, savannas and other ecosystems; and to relate environmental policies to environmental issues and economic development.

Center for Network Neuroscience


Main Office
Science Research Building, 120
P.O. Box 305220
Denton, TX 76203-5220
(940) 565-3615
E-mail: gross@cnns.org

Guenter W. Gross, Director

Students interested in neurobiology, neuropharmacology, tissue-based biosensors or the mathematics of neural modeling may participate in an interdisciplinary research effort directed at investigating the behavior of neurons in networks and the application of network dynamics to the field of neurotoxicology, drug development, biosensors and small ensemble information processing.

The center specializes in in vitro preparations, especially monolayer cultures of mammalian (mouse) central nervous system cells that emphasize research on pattern generation. The center pioneered the development and application of photoetched multimicroelectrode arrays and special culture chambers that allow the simultaneous monitoring of electrical activity at 64 sites in a network. Sophisticated multichannel data analysis systems support these research efforts.

Laboratory of Forensic Anthropology and Human Identification


Main Office
Department of Biological Sciences
E-mail: harrell@unt.edu

Harrell Gill-King, Director

The Laboratory of Forensic Anthropology and Human Identification provides field search and recovery technology and scientific laboratory analysis of human remains to medical examiners, coroners and law enforcement agencies within the state of Texas. The laboratory also provides accredited professional training in various aspects of forensic science to death investigators. The main laboratory and x-ray facility are housed in the Department of Biological Sciences together with a teaching laboratory. Cooperating facilities include the Videocomputing Laboratory (Center for Instructional Services) and the Zooarchaeology Laboratory (Institute of Applied Science). Research activities focus on material properties of bone, isotopic dietary reconstruction and taphonomy.

Financial Support

Most of our graduate students are supported through teaching assistantships (TAs) and research assistantships (RAs) funded through research grants to faculty. Assistantships are limited to 20 hours per week, which is considered as half-time employment. Nine-month stipends range from $9,200 for entering master's students to $11,400 for PhD candidates. In addition, out-of-state and international students who are supported at least one-half time are eligible for in-state tuition. Students supported for nine months on TAs or RAs are eligible for 12-month health insurance coverage. A limited number of summer TAs are available. Contact the Administrative Services Officer at (940) 565-3600 for further information about assistantships. Contact Student Financial Aid and Scholarships at (940) 565-2302 for student loan information.

Courses of Instruction

All Courses of Instruction are located in one section at the back of this catalog.

Course and Subject Guide

The "Course and Subject Guide," found in the Courses of Instruction section of this book, serves as a table of contents and provides quick access to subject areas and prefixes.

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