Philosophy and Religion Studies

Philosophy, PHIL

5110. Seminar in the Theory of Knowledge. 3 hours. Analysis of the essential problems involved in the theory of knowledge, including some of the classical answers to important epistemological problems.

5250. Seminar in the Philosophy of Natural Science. 3 hours. A study of the nature, limits and significances of physics, chemistry, biology and related sciences with emphasis on the similarities and contrasts between scientific and other modes of knowing.

5260. Seminar in Philosophy of Social Science. 3 hours. Questions on explanations, observable human purposes and science of valuation. Contrasting science, ideology and occultism. Darwinism as conceptual scheme. The "causal" status of symbols and verbal behavior. Debates about objectivity, Verstehen, phenomenology and behaviorism, referring to K. Popper, G. Nettler, L.A. White, B.F. Skinner, C. Geertz, T. Kuhn, P. Winch and M. Weber.

5315. Topics in Ancient Philosophy. 3 hours. An examination of some major problem areas in the history of ancient Western philosophy — for example: concepts of nature, concepts of the character and function of knowledge, concepts of the nature and extent of value. Major thinkers normally covered include Plato and Aristotle.

5335. Topics in Modern Philosophy. 3 hours. An examination of some major problem areas in the history of modern Western philosophy — for example: concepts of nature, concepts of the character and function of knowledge, concepts of the nature and extent of value. Major thinkers covered can include Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Hume and Kant.

5410. Seminar in Ethical Theory. 3 hours. An examination of a variety of ethical theories and their application in applied situations.

5450. Seminar in the Philosophy of Ecology. 3 hours. Traces the evolution of ecology from its roots in 19th-century natural history through general ecology, restoration ecology, human ecology and mathematical ecology. Also explores the sociocultural contexts in which ecology emerged and now exists, including the so-called second scientific revolution and the two-culture split.

5451. Environmental Ethics. 3 hours. Examination of basic positions in the field of environmental ethics with emphasis on legal and moral rights for nature, animal liberation, and Western philosophical and religious traditions.

5670. Natural History and Philosophy of Rivers. 6 hours. (3;5) Ecological, geological and philosophical history of arid watersheds of the western United States. Extended field trip required. Desert canyons are geologically unique and present wonderful opportunities to study interactions of geology, fauna, flora, environment, cultural development and environmental ethics. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. (Same as BIOL 5670.)

5700. Seminar in Environmental Ethics. 3 hours. An intensive analysis of new positions in environmental ethics with special emphasis on their theoretical value as a contribution to contemporary philosophy and their practical value with regard to environmental policy and decision making.

5710. Ecofeminism: Women's Studies and Environmental Ethics. 3 hours. Examines the merger of feminism with environmental ethics and its subsequent evolution. Subject matter includes the analysis of patriarchy, gender issues and multicultural perspectives within the larger framework of ethical responses to ecocrisis.

5720. Comparative Environmental Ethics. 3 hours. An exploration of resources for environmental philosophy in non-Western traditions, focusing on India but including Taoist and Buddhist traditions.

5730. Western Religion and the Environment. 3 hours. A historic and contemporary overview of Euro-American religious thought concerning the environment, including investigation of the ancient Western religions, Judaism, Christianity and Native American religions.

5800. Seminar in Symbolic Logic and Metamathematics. 3 hours. Review of the history, development and present status of symbolic logic and metamathematics, including a consideration of the problems encountered in the philosophical interpretation of logical concepts.

5900-5910. Special Problems. 1-3 hours each. Prerequisite(s): consent of department.

5950. Master's Thesis. 3 or 6 hours. To be scheduled only with consent of department. 6 hours credit required. No credit assigned until thesis has been completed and filed with the graduate dean. Continuous enrollment required once work on the thesis has begun. May be repeated for credit.

5960. Seminar in Problems of Philosophy. 3 hours. Intensive analysis of major philosophical issues against the background of classical and contemporary investigations. May be repeated for credit.

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