Geography Courses

Archaeology, ARCH = 0139

Earth Science, GEOG = 0140

Geology, GEOL = 0141

Regional Science, GEOG = 0140

Archaeology, ARCH = 0139

2500. Introduction to Archaeology. 3 hours. A survey of the techniques, methods and theories of archaeology. An important focus of the course is on the reconstruction of the culture and ecology of prehistoric societies in both the Old World and the New World. (Same as ANTH 2500.)

2800. Archaeological Science. 4 hours. (3;1) Human prehistory and methods of scientific investigation; emphasizes archaeological cultures from early hominid sites in East Africa to entry of peoples into the New World. Course stresses methods of interdisciplinary research, including geology, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, paleodiet and artifact-faunal analysis. Labs employ artifacts and bones for study. A laboratory science course in the Arts and Sciences and University Core Curriculum.

2900. Special Problems. 1-3 hours.

3650. Origins of Civilization. 3 hours. The comparative study of the cultural, technological and ecological patterns of change leading to urban civilizations. Surveys the archaeological evidence for the domestication of plants and animals, and the emergence of villages. The art, architecture, economic and sociopolitical characteristics of early civilizations in the Near East and Meso-America are examined. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1010 or 2250 or ARCH 2500, or consent of department. (Same as ANTH 3650.)

4620. Topics in Archaeology. 3 hours. Selected topics of interest and significance in archaeology. Subjects such as historic archaeology, Texas archaeology, New World archaeology, Old World archaeology and Meso-American archaeology are potential topics offered during different semesters. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2500 or consent of department. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (Same as ANTH 4620.)

4810. Archaeological Field School. 6 hours. Comprehensive training in site survey, excavation techniques, laboratory processing, restoration and analysis of archaeological materials through direct participation in an archaeological field project. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2500 or consent of department. Held off campus; room and board fees may be required. Usually offered only during the summer months and based on the availability of field projects. This course is taught in cooperation with the Institute of Applied Sciences. (Same as ANTH 4810.)

Earth Science, GEOG = 0140

1710 (1401). Earth Science. 4 hours. (3;3) Principles and processes of physical geography. Interrelationship of forces operating on the earth's surface that create typical associations of climate, vegetation, soils and landforms. A laboratory science course in the Arts and Sciences and University Core Curriculum.

2900. Special Problems. 1-3 hours. Individual readings and laboratory research projects in geology, earth and regional sciences.

3050. Cartography and Graphics. 3 hours. Construction and interpretation of topographic maps; thematic mapping of geographically referenced data; field mapping and surveying techniques; introduction to geographic information systems and computer graphics.

3350. Geomorphology. 3 hours. Processes of landform analysis. Glacial, desert, fluvial and other settings are reviewed along with basic processes of construction, erosion and weathering. Prerequisite(s): GEOL 1610, GEOG 1710, or consent of department.

4170. Map-Air Photo Analysis. 3 hours. Evaluation and interpretation of aerial photography and satellite images from the most common sensing radar. Digital processing of satellite data on microcomputer. Prerequisite(s): GEOL 1610, GEOG 1710, 2400, or consent of department.

4240. Meteorology. 3 hours. Weather elements and controls; air masses and upper air wind flow; emphasis on atmospheric storm systems. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1710 or consent of department.

4250. Climatology. 3 hours. Description and analysis of world climates; major classifications, controls, regional distribution and change. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1710 or consent of department.

4420. Conservation of Resources. 3 hours. Designed to encourage an awareness of the need for wise use and proper management of the natural resources on which human welfare depends; how resources management operates in the framework of laws and policies,
technical resource knowledge, education, and economics.

4500. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. 3 hours. (2;2) Introduction to the concepts of computer-based spatial data handling, known as geographic information systems (GIS) technology. Presents the concepts of GIS in a general way utilizing several GIS packages and hypothetical GIS problems. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1100 or consent of department.

4550. Advanced GIS. 3 hours. Advanced spatial analysis through the use of specialized computer software and the design and development of spatial databases. The course includes project planning, database development, data manipulation and analyses, cartographic output and project presentation. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 4500 or consent of department.

4750. Fluvial Geomorphology. 3 hours. Examines the role of rivers as geomorphologic agents. Includes discussion of the systems approach to fluvial geomorphology, fluid mechanics of open-channel flow, sediment and solute transport, channel morphology and river adjustments to environmental change at various time scales. Prerequisite(s): GEOL 1610, GEOG 1710 or consent of department.

4900-4910. Special Problems. 1-3 hours each.

4920. Cooperative Education in Geography. 3 hours. Job experience in a government agency and/or business for geography majors. Requires participation in a formal project. Prerequisite(s): a minimum of 12 hours completed in the major, a 2.5 GPA in the major and consent of the internship director.

4960. Geography Institute. 3 hours. For students accepted by the university as participants in special institute courses. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

Geology, GEOL = 0141

1610 (1403). Introductory Physical Geology. 4 hours. (3;3) Part I of a systematic introduction to geology; the internal and external processes that contribute to the earth's rock record; includes consideration of minerals, the earth's interior, volcanoes, mountain building, and terrestrial and oceanic sedimentation. A laboratory science course in the Arts and Sciences and University Core Curriculum.

2900. Special Problems. 1-3 hours.

3000. Geology of Texas. 3 hours. Rocks, minerals, fossils and geologic history of Texas; the state's stratigraphic sequence, structural geology and mineral resources; field trips. Prerequisite(s): GEOL 1610, GEOG 1710 or consent of department.

3020. Historical Geology. 3 hours. Topics to include stratigraphy, sedimentology, plant and animal fossils, geologic time, continental drift, tectonics, former seas and past environments. Emphasis on geologic history of North America. Field trips. Prerequisite(s): GEOL 1610.

4630. Soils Geomorphology. 4 hours. (3;3) Methods and applications of soils and landform analysis. Soils classification, formation processes and relationships to landforms and vegetation are stressed. Methods of soils description, mapping and physical-chemical analysis are taught, and applications to study of landscape change and land-use planning are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 3350 or consent of department.

4650. Environmental Geology. 3 hours. Geologic aspects of land-use planning; earthquakes, landslides, coastal processes, streams and flooding, soils, groundwater, and waste disposal; planning for the future. Prerequisite(s): GEOL 1610, GEOG 1710 or consent of department.

4850. Introduction to Groundwater Hydrology. 3 hours. Topics to include principles of groundwater flow; aquifer properties and characteristics; geology of groundwater occurrence; groundwater development and methods for assessing and remediating the environmental problem of groundwater contamination. Emphasis on application of basic principles. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1650 or equivalent; GEOL 1610, GEOG 1710 or consent of department.

Regional Science, GEOG = 0140

1170. Introductory Human Geography. 3 hours. Spatial patterns of human phenomena; areal variations in form of economy and culture. Satisfies the Social Sciences and Philosophy requirement of the University Core Curriculum.

1200 (1303). World Regional Geography. 3 hours. Geographical characteristics, major problems and role of major world regions; emphasis on Central and South America, Africa, Middle East and Asia. Satisfies the Crosscultural and Global Studies requirement of the University Core Curriculum.

2400. Applied Geography. 3 hours. Problem solving by application of geographic concepts, methodologies and techniques. Examples drawn from physical and human geography.

2900. Special Problems. 1-3 hours. Individual readings and laboratory research projects in geology, earth and regional sciences.

3010. Economic Geography. 3 hours. Geographic principles applied to understanding regional specialization of economic activity. National and international variations in agriculture, energy, manufacturing, service activities and commodity flows. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1170, 1200, 2400 or consent of department.

3100. Geography of the United States and Canada. 3 hours. Regional analysis of the physical and human geography of the United
States and Canada.

3190. Quantitative Methods in Geography. 3 hours. Application of statistical techniques and mathematical models to spatial analysis, including both point and areal patterns. Examples drawn from both earth and regional sciences.

3450. Europe. 3 hours. Spatial patterns of human and environmental phenomena; cultural, historical and political geography.

3800. Geography of Texas. 3 hours. The physical geography of Texas and the human response to the physical environment.

4060. Computer Cartography. 3 hours. (1;2) An introduction to conceptual and practical aspects of computer cartography. Topics include: importation of digital maps; map editing; editing map attribute databases; map design and printing. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 3050 or consent of department.

4120. Medical Geography. 3 hours. Locational aspects of disease and health care, spatial patterns of diseases, health facilities, health care policies and problems. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 2400 or consent of department.

4210. Urban Geography. 3 hours. The urban geography of advanced nations. Specific topics include urban systems analysis, the internal geography of cities and contemporary spatial and social changes in urban areas. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1170, 1200, 2400 or consent of department.

4310. Land Use and Locational Conflict. 3 hours. Principles of locational conflict. Analysis of the effects of land use change on the characteristics of regions. Identification of land use conflicts generated by economic and social change. Study of geographic variations in land-use dynamics. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1170, 1200, 2400 or consent of department.

4410. Location-Allocation Modeling. 3 hours. Introduction to location-allocation models for service delivery. Covering, p-median, p-center and hierarchial models and their applications; data accuracy, aggregation and distance problems in location-allocation modeling. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1100, GEOG 2400, or consent of department.

4900-4910. Special Problems. 1-3 hours each.

4960. Geography Institute. 3 hours. For students accepted by the university as participants in special institute courses. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

Graduate Catalog Geography Courses


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