Department of English

Main Departmental Office

Auditorium Building, 112

P.O. Box 311307

Denton, TX 76203-1307

(940) 565-2050

Web site: www.engl.unt.edu

E-mail: englgrad@twlab.unt.edu

James T. F. Tanner, Chair

Graduate Faculty: Baird, Blaine, Bogle, Bond, Chelliah, Cukor-Avila, Duban, Eubank, Ford, Holdeman, Hummell, Kesterson, Landman, Leath, Martin, May, Mitchell, Montler, Palmer, Parrish, Pettit, Preston, Raign, Richardson, Rodman, Ross, Shirk, Simpkins, Sims, Spiller, Stevens, Tanner, Vanhoutte, Vann, Warde, Wright.

Students in the graduate program in the Department of English have the opportunity to study with active scholars who publish regularly and lecture both in the United States and abroad in their areas of scholarly interest. Graduates who choose to pursue a college or university position can make use of the department's associations with other departments in several countries to find employment. Students who choose to use their skills in business or industry will find that the department's intern program can place them in paid positions that will allow them to put their liberal arts education to work on practical tasks. Technical writing, creative writing, process analysis, journalism, advertising and management positions are among the many jobs held by students and graduates of the department.

The Department of English administers a number of academic programs. At the doctoral level, the central area of focus involves the department's main expertise in British and American literature, including both canonical masterpieces and more non-traditional literature and criticism. At the master's level, however, the range of academic programs includes the analysis of English literature, but also goes well beyond this focus to include areas that have little to do with literature (canonical or not). These areas are creative writing, English as a Second Language, technical and persuasive writing, and linguistics.

Academic research and the professor-student mentoring relationship are central to the department's very mission. To accomplish this mission, the faculty of the Department of English regularly contribute articles to such journals as Centennial Review, Literary Review, Philological Quarterly, Lingua, Modern Philology, The Chaucer Review, Semiotica, Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Technical Communication Quarterly, Language Variation and Change, Second Language Research and Language Acquisition. English faculty have also recently published books on Hemingway, Mansfield, Melville, Porter, Smollett, Victorian periodicals, serialized Victorian novels, Texas literature, the core curriculum, professional communication, Universal Grammar, American Indian language and African-American Vernacular English. They have also read papers at national and international conferences such as those of the Modern Language Association, the Linguistic Society of America and the Boston Univesity Conference on Language Development.

In addition, the faculty in English strive to accomplish the mentoring relationship critical to a successful graduate program by actively helping students not just with their regularly scheduled courses and with their thesis and dissertation work, but also with the preparation of student papers for publication and presentation. In recent times, faculty have thus worked closely with graduate students on academic work appearing in such prestigious venues as The Philological Quarterly, Semiotica, Comparative Drama, The Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, and Language Acquisition. Faculty also assist graduate students with student presentations at conferences such as The Society for 18th Century Studies, The International Congress on Medieval Studies, The International Pychon Conference, The South Central Women's Studies Conference and the Second Language Research Forum.

Further, the Department of English provides support for its activities in research and graduate education through its journals. Currently, the department sponsors five journals:

Finally, it is important to note that library holdings in English are strong in British literature and American literature. The rare books collection includes manuscripts and incunabula. Especially strong are library holdings in prose fiction, both primary works and criticism, and Texana. The library maintains special collections of 18th- and 19th-century travel narratives; 18th-century English literature; 19th- and early 20th-century children's literature; and manuscripts, papers and special editions of the novelist Larry McMurtry, a UNT graduate.

Degree Programs

The Department of English offers the following degrees:

The Department of English has recently applied to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board to offer the Master of Arts with a major in English and a concentration in creative writing. Check the department's Web site (www.engl.unt.edu) for updates on the status of this pending degree.

Master of Arts

The student who is not given permission to write a thesis or to register for ENGL 5920-5930 (Research Problems in Lieu of Thesis) will complete a 36-semester-hour program, as approved by the chair of graduate studies.

The student who has permission to write a thesis or to enroll in ENGL 5920-5930 must complete a total of 30 semester hours of work, including either 6 hours of thesis credit (ENGL 5950) or 6 hours of credit in ENGL 5920-5930, as approved by the graduate adviser.

Admission Requirements and Procedures

To be eligible for admission to any MA degree program in English, the applicant must have at least a 3.0 GPA on the last 60 undergraduate semester hours of work prior to receiving the bachelor's degree, or a 2.8 GPA on all undergraduate work. Up to 24 hours of undergraduate course work may be required. Prerequisite course work is determined by the chair of graduate studies on the basis of the applicant's educational background and area of scholarly interest. The verbal aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required of applicants entering the department. The student must have taken the examination prior to or during the first semester of graduate study, and must score in the 50th percentile or higher on the verbal aptitude section. A student who fails to comply with this requirement will not be allowed to re-register as a master's degree candidate with a major in English except in unusual circumstances and with the consent of the chair of the Department of English and the dean of the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies. International students may satisfy the GRE requirement by making a score of 575 on the TOEFL examination.

Prospective students are encouraged to apply to any of the master's degree programs administered by the Department of English. To do so, contact the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies or the department.

Financial Assistance for MA Students

Beginning full-time students who meet all qualifications may apply for financial assistance in the form of the academic assistantship; those who have already completed 18 graduate hours in an area offered by the Department of English may apply for a teaching fellowship. Applications for both may be requested from the department by telephone, e-mail, or the department Web site.

Foreign Language Requirement

For the Master of Arts degrees with a major in English, the student must have a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language. As evidence of such foreign language, a student may present the results of a standardized examination or have completed the sophomore year of a foreign language, or the equivalent, provided that the grade point average on all language courses is 2.75 or higher.

Students seeking the Master of Arts with a major in linguistics must show basic knowledge of one Indo-European language and one non-Indo-European language. The Indo-European language requirement may be met by any of the means currently accepted by the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies. The non-Indo-
European language requirement may be met by enrolling for LING 5380 (Field Methods) when the topic of this course involves a non-Indo-European language.

A student who has permission to write a thesis or to enroll in ENGL 5920-5930 will not be allowed to register for the courses until the foreign language requirement has been met.

Degree Plan Requirement

During the second semester of graduate work toward the Master of Arts degree in English, the student is required to file a degree plan in the office of the chair of graduate studies in English. Students should obtain an appointment as soon as possible after the registration period during their second semester's work.

Comprehensive Examination

The candidate for the MA degree must pass the master's comprehensive examination. This examination is administered by the graduate committee of the Department of English and is given several times per year. Students must register for this examination at the appropriate time in the office of the chair of graduate studies in English. Students should consult with the graduate adviser early in their programs to learn of the specific nature of the comprehensive examination. The comprehensive examination may be taken twice. If the candidate fails the examination on both occasions, then permission for any retake of the examination must be granted by the graduate committee.

Thesis and Problems in Lieu of Thesis

A student is permitted to write a thesis or to enroll in ENGL 5920-5930 (Research Problems in Lieu of Thesis) only with the permission of the chair of graduate studies and a major professor. For most courses of study leading to the Master of Arts with a major in English, it is expected that the student will complete 36 hours of course work without a thesis.

No student who has permission to write a thesis or to enroll in ENGL 5920-5930 will be allowed to register for the courses until the foreign language requirement has been met.

Master of Arts with a Major in English

All students working toward the Master of Arts with a major in English must complete the following courses.

In addition to the required courses listed above, the student who is not given permission to write a thesis or to enroll for ENGL 5920-5930 (Research Problems in Lieu of Thesis) must complete 27 semester hours of additional course work.

The student who is given permission to write a thesis or to enroll in ENGL 5920-5930 will complete 21 hours of course work in addition to the required courses listed above. Course work to complete the additional requirements may be taken in the traditional areas of literature, writing or linguistics, as approved by the chair of graduate studies.

During the first semester of graduate work, the student must consult the chair of graduate studies.

Only one 4000-level course may count toward the Master of Arts with a major in English.

Master of Arts with a Major in English and a Concentration in Technical Writing

Option I: 36-Hour Program with Written Examination

Option II: 30-Hour Program with Thesis

ENGL 4180 and 4190 or consent of instructor is required before a student may register for graduate-level courses in technical writing. No more than one 4000-level course may be counted as part of the degree program.

Master of Arts with a Major in English and a Concentration in ESL

Option I: 30-Hour Program with Thesis

Option II: 30-Hour Program with Scholarly Papers

Option III: 36-Hour Program with Written Exam

Required Courses for all Three Options

ENGL 4040 or LING 5040 or consent of instructor is required before a student may register for LING 5060 (Second Language Acquisition), LING 5300 (Phonology), LING 5310 (Syntax), LING 5330 (Sociolinguistics), LING 5360 (Field Methods) or LING 5360 (Typology). Subject to approval by the chair of graduate studies, students may count one 4000-level course and 3 hours outside of linguistics/ESL toward this degree.

Master of Arts with a Major in Linguistics

All students seeking the Master of Arts with a major in linguistics are required to write a thesis. The degree requires a total of 36 semester hours, which include 6 hours of thesis (LING 5950).

The following core courses are required of all students in this MA program:

Students must take 15-18 hours from among the following areas:

Students may take up to three hours at the graduate level in a cognate area. Cognate hours for the Master of Arts with a major in linguistics may be taken in anthropology, biology (neuroscience), experimental psychology, philosophy, communication studies, speech pathology, foreign languages, or computer science. To take a cognate-area course outside of these areas, students must seek approval in advance from the chair of graduate studies.

Students seeking the Master of Arts with a major in linguistics must show basic knowledge of one Indo-European language and one non-Indo-European language. The Indo-European language requirement may be met by any of the means currently accepted by the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies. The non-Indo-European language requirement may be met by enrolling for LING 5380 (Field Methods) when the topic of this course involves a non-Indo-European language.

Doctor of Philosophy with a Major in English

Admission Requirements and Procedures

Admission to the doctoral program in English is highly competitive. At the beginning of each academic year, no more than 15 students are admitted. Admission is granted only at the beginning of each fall semester; students cannot enter the program during any other semester. Deadline for application is January 15 of each academic year.

All applicants must meet the following minimum standards.

1. Graduate Record Examination. While most students in the doctoral program have scores above the 85th percentile, every applicant is required to make a score representing the 70th percentile or above on the verbal portion of the aptitude test. The student must also meet GRE requirements established by the Graduate Council and must comply with general regulations concerning the GRE in relevant sections of this bulletin. Applicants whose native language is not English must either meet the GRE requirement above or present a score on the TOEFL of at least 630.

2. Academic record. The applicant must have at least a 3.5 overall GPA on all undergraduate semester hours of work prior to receiving the bachelor's degree. An applicant who has completed any graduate-level work must have at least a 3.5 overall GPA on such graduate work.

3. School of Graduate Studies admission. The applicant must meet the qualifications for admission set by the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies of the University of North Texas.

To apply to the doctoral program in English, applicants must submit all of the following:

All application materials may be requested from the department by telephone, e-mail, or their website.

Financial Assistance

Full-time students who meet all qualifications for both the doctoral program and for instructional positions will be offered employment as graders, academic assistants or teaching fellows in the Department of English, thus receiving financial support for a five-year period in the pursuit of the doctoral degree. Financial support will normally not be awarded beyond the fifth year of graduate studies. Students are not required to perform any instructional services if they do not want to receive this form of financial aid. Part-time students will normally be employed elsewhere, but, if qualified, they are not precluded from performing instructional services at some time during their studies.

Scholarships may be awarded to incoming graduate students who show unusual promise as indicated by their application credentials. These will normally be one-year scholarships for students not yet eligible to be teaching fellows. Similar scholarships may also be awarded to students in their fifth year, principally to help defray the costs of producing a dissertation.

Residence

The student must meet the doctoral residence requirement described in the general section of this bulletin dealing with requirements for the doctoral degree.

Foreign Language Requirement

All students must demonstrate competency in one language other than their native language and other than English in one of the following ways (as stipulated by the Graduate School):

1. for languages that are no longer spoken (e.g., Latin), by passing the Foreign Language Proficiency Examination administered each semester and summer term by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, application for which must be obtained in the office of the chair of the department; scheduled dates for taking the examination in the current academic year appear in the front of this catalog; or

2. by completing two advanced courses (3000, 4000, or 5000 level) in a single foreign language, with a grade point average on both courses of at least 3.0. (These advanced courses exclude the graduate-level "reading" courses offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures.)

Students satisfying the requirement, by either method, through the UNT Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures will, generally, be limited to French, German, Latin or Spanish. Another language may be offered to satisfy the requirement, provided that both sufficient rationale as a tool and linguistic competency are demonstrated to the satisfaction of the graduate committee of the Department of English.

Admission to Candidacy

After admission to PhD study, a graduate student will be accepted for candidacy for the PhD after accomplishing all of the following:

1. successful completion of all required courses, including at least three doctoral seminars chosen from ENGL 6020, 6200, 6250, 6410, 6500, 6530 or 6590;

2. successful completion of foreign language requirements; and

3. successful completion of the fourth year qualifying oral examination.

Curriculum

All students in the doctoral program must complete 90 semester hours of graduate work beyond the bachelor's degree.

Each student is encouraged to choose a major area by the end of the second year and must have chosen a major prior to registration for the spring semester of the third year.

The student must major in one of the following seven areas and must write the dissertation in that area:

Scheduled Program of Study

Each student is expected to take courses as nearly as possible in the order stipulated below. All deviations from the scheduled program of study in the first two years must be approved in advance by the chair of graduate studies. Courses preceded by a bullet (·) must be taken by all students in the program. However, students entering the program with an approved MA degree in English (up to 30 hours) or students entering the UNT program with graduate-level transfer credits from another institution (up to 24 hours) may seek an exemption from those courses preceded by an asterisk (*). Students seeking such an exemption must provide the chair of graduate studies with a course syllabus from each original course. All decisions on exemptions are at the discretion of the graduate committee.

First Year, Fall Semester:

First Year, Spring Semester:

Second Year, Fall Semester:

Second Year, Spring Semester:

Third Year, Fall Semester:

Third Year, Spring Semester:

Fourth Year, Fall Semester:

Fourth Year, Spring Semester:

Fifth Year, Fall Semester:

Fifth Year, Spring Semester:

Program Examinations

1. Second year written essay examination. Students who have completed all their required course work with at least a 3.5 grade point average may continue in the program without examination. Students with less than a 3.5 average and who desire to continue in the program will be permitted to take a four-hour essay examination. There are three levels of evaluation of this examination: 1) pass and continue in the PhD program; 2) conditional pass and be awarded an MA degree; or 3) fail, with the option of taking the examination one more time for an MA degree. This examination will be prepared, administered and evaluated by the graduate committee.

Students will be given a choice of essay topics in all the areas covered by the required course work and will write two two-hour essays on topics from two different areas of the student's choice. This examination will normally be administered during the first summer session each year.

2. Fourth year oral examination. During the period from November 1 to the end of the fall semester of the fourth year in the program, each full-time student will take a two-hour oral examination covering the major only. Part-time students will be required to take this examination when they have reached an equivalent point in their program, i.e., the completion of approximately 54 hours of course work. This oral examination will be administered by an examination committee composed of at least three faculty members appointed by the chair of graduate studies in consultation with the area adviser of the relevant major area. The examination committee will become the student's dissertation committee. Any exemptions must be approved in advance by the graduate committee.

On the oral examination students may pass outright, may pass conditionally, or may fail. The conditional student may be required to write an essay(s) or retake all or part of the oral examination. The student who fails the oral may petition the graduate committee to repeat the oral examination the following spring semester, but will not be allowed to register for courses during that semester.

3. Fourth-year dissertation prospectus. Each student is required to provide an extended and detailed dissertation prospectus to his or her dissertation committee. The prospectus, developed while the student is enrolled for ENGL 6941/2/3, must be turned in to the dissertation committee no later than the end of April of the fourth year.

The dissertation prospectus must be approved by all members of the student's dissertation committee. The approved prospectus, along with a prospectus cover sheet and approval form, must be turned in to the chair of graduate studies. The faculty committee that approves the prospectus must be the same as the dissertation committee. Any changes in the constitution of the dissertation committee must be approved by the graduate committee. Students may not enroll for dissertation until the prospectus has been approved by the dissertation committee and turned in to the chair of graduate studies.

4. Final comprehensive examination (dissertation defense). The candidate is required to take an oral comprehensive examination over the contents of the dissertation. This examination will be administered and evaluated by the members of the student's dissertation committee.

Dissertation Requirement

1. A dissertation is required of all candidates for the doctorate. The dissertation must be a work of original research and writing justifying the awarding of the doctoral degree.

2. Students cannot enroll for dissertation credit until the fourth year oral examination has been passed, foreign language requirements have been met, and the dissertation prospectus has been approved.

3. Students enrolled for dissertation credit must comply with the continuous enrollment policy set forth in appropriate sections of this bulletin.

4. The dissertation committee is composed of three faculty members. The dissertation will be directed by a qualified faculty member whose area of expertise is in the student's major area. Two other faculty members from the Department of English constitute the rest of the dissertation committee. Area advisers and the chair of graduate studies will assist students in the selection of the dissertation committee.

5. When the dissertation is completed and has received the preliminary approval of the dissertation committee, the dissertation director will schedule the final comprehensive examination (dissertation defense) and notify the chair of graduate studies in English and the dean of the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies of the date and time of the examination. The dissertation will be submitted to the chair of graduate studies in English only after this examination has been passed. After the approval of the chair of
graduate studies in English has been secured, the dissertation will then be transmitted to the graduate dean's office and finally approved by the graduate dean.

6. Instructions for submitting the dissertation may be obtained from the graduate dean's office. Students should consult the Academic Calendar in the annual Graduate Catalog for deadlines.

Courses of Instruction

All Courses of Instruction are located in one section at the back of this catalog.

Course and Subject Guide

The "Course and Subject Guide," found in the Courses of Instruction section of this book, serves as a table of contents and provides quick access to subject areas and prefixes.

Undergraduate Catalog Department of English

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