College of Arts and Sciences

Main Office

General Academic Building, 210

P.O. Box 305189

Denton, TX 76203-5189

(940) 565-2497

Fax: (940) 565-4517

E-mail: cas@unt.edu

Web site: www.cas.unt.edu

Student Advising Office

Web site: www.cas.unt.edu/advising

General Academic Building, 313

(940) 565-2051

Warren W. Burggren, Dean

William Kamman, Associate Dean

Jean B. Schaake, Associate Dean

Kathryn G. Cullivan, Assistant Dean

Introduction

The College of Arts and Sciences, with its divisions of science and technology, humanities and arts, and social sciences, is organized to promote lively programs of study in an intellectual climate in which specialized learning links with other areas of knowledge to foster an understanding of the world around and beyond us.

Since the college intends to provide students with a strong general education and to prepare them for successful careers in the modern world indeed, into the 21st century its core curriculum and degree programs help students develop the critical thinking essential for achieving a high quality of life through better understanding and appreciation of the many varied aspects of our society and civilization, as well as the qualifications for succeeding in a professional field.

Consistent with the goal of a coherent education that anticipates the 21st century, the college prepares students to exhibit certain specific basic proficiencies:

1. literacy in written English, mathematics, oral communication and computer science;

2. qualitative and quantitative understanding of the basic processes of the physical and life sciences;

3. working knowledge of a foreign language and foreign culture beyond the two years expected before entering college;

4. understanding and appreciation of the various fields of learning represented by historical inquiry, the visual and performing arts, the processes of thought in the humanities and philosophy, and the investigation of the causes and consequences of human actions pursued in the social sciences; and

5. appropriate levels of knowledge and critical ability in a chosen discipline and its method of inquiry.

Students who follow degree plans consistent with the educational intentions of the college will receive the intellectual stimulation and the conceptual framework to explore critically the interconnected worlds of self, man, society and nature. They will acquire the necessary literacies and broad-based exposure to the main elements of human experience that initiate the lifelong process of being an educated person and, in most instances, also provide the means to enter graduate or professional schools or directly into a variety of careers.

The college consists of 20 departments under the following classifications.

Humanities and Arts

Communication Studies

Dance and Theatre Arts

English

Foreign Languages and Literatures

History

Journalism

Philosophy and Religion Studies

Radio, Television and Film

Speech and Hearing Sciences

Social Sciences

Economics

Geography

History

Philosophy and Religion Studies

Political Science

Psychology

Science and Technology

Biological Sciences

Chemistry

Computer Sciences

Engineering Technology

Geography

Mathematics

Materials Science

Physics

Academic Advising

Information about academic matters is available from various sources within the College of Arts and Sciences. For students who have selected their major, advising is available in the major department. For other students, including undecided majors, freshmen and transfer students, academic advising is available throughout the year in the College of Arts and Sciences Student Advising Office, Room 313, General Academic Building. Advisers in this office assist students in the selection of courses and answer questions about selecting a major, degree plans, application of transfer credit, and general academic requirements, policies and procedures.

Degree Plan

Students should have a degree plan prepared in their academic dean's office at the beginning of their junior year. Transfer students who have chosen a major should have a degree plan made during their first semester at UNT.

Students should take a complete transcript of all college work to their faculty advisers for conferences to fill out advisory sheets. After the advisory sheets have been signed by both the adviser and the department chair, students should bring all materials to the College of Arts and Sciences Student Advising Office, where official degree plans will be prepared. Graduation checks should be requested during the semester before graduation.

Programs of Study

The college offers the following undergraduate degrees:

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees must satisfy all general requirements for the bachelors degree listed in the Academics section of this catalog, and all requirements of the arts and sciences core curriculum as listed below. Note: Core requirements were being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact a degree program adviser for more information.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts must meet the following requirements.

1. Hours Required for the Degree: Completion of a minimum of 128 total semester hours; 42 must be advanced.

2. General University Requirements: See "General Degree Requirements " in the Academics section of this catalog.

3. College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum: Minimum 61 hours (includes requirements of University Core Curriculum). See "Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum " in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog for specific core requirements and list of approved courses. See specific degree plan for exact hours.

Note: Core requirements were being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact a degree program adviser for more information.

4. Major Requirements: A major of at least 24 semester hours; 12 hours of advanced work in the major must be completed at UNT.

5. Minor: A minor is at least 18 hours, of which a minimum of 6 hours must be advanced, from a field outside the major. Minors are chosen with faculty advisers for selected majors. For some majors the minor is specified, but for most majors a minor field is optional. Consult major requirements.

6. Electives: See individual major.

7. Other Course Requirements: See individual major.

8. Other Requirements: Completion of all other requirements for a major and a minor as specified by the respective departments.

DRED (Traffic Safety) courses may not be used to satisfy any portion of a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science must meet the following requirements.

1. Hours Required for the Degree: Completion of a minimum of 128 total semester hours; 42 must be advanced.

2. General University Requirements: See "General Degree Requirements" in the Academics section of this catalog.

3. College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum: Minimum 61 hours. See "Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum" in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog for specific core requirements and list of approved courses. See specific degree plan for exact hours.

Note: Core requirements were being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact a degree program adviser for more information.

4. Major Requirements: A major of at least 24 semester hours; 12 hours of advanced work in the major must be completed at UNT.

5. Minor: A minor is at least 18 hours, of which a minimum of 6 hours must be advanced, from a field outside the major. Minors are chosen with faculty advisers for selected majors. For some majors the minor is specified, but for most majors a minor field is optional. Consult major requirements.

6. Electives: See individual major.

7. Other Course Requirements: See individual major.

8. Other Requirements: Completion of all other requirements for a major and a minor as specified by the respective departments.

DRED (Traffic Safety) courses may not be used to satisfy any portion of a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum

Note: Core requirements were being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact a degree program adviser for more information.

In addition to the University Core Curriculum , the College of Arts and Sciences requires one course (4 hours) with laboratory in physical science, a specified course in mathematics and proficiency in one foreign language above the two years usually required in high school. The proficiency in foreign language may be satisfied through examination or by completing LANG 2040-2050. Consult the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for placement. The Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum for the BA and BS requires that specific courses contained in parts of the University Core Curriculum be taken to satisfy particular degree requirements. Students must consult program advisers for a list of required courses. Students may be required to take extra courses if they fail to take these courses.

The following courses will satisfy both the College of Arts and Sciences and the University Core Curriculum.

Competencies

1. Computer Science (0-3 hours): Competency in computer use may be demonstrated by either: (1) credit for CSCI 1100 or equivalent, including credit by examination or (b) a proficiency test measuring practical applications ability and fundamental knowledge of computer architecture and hardware.

2. Oral Communication (0-3 hours): (a) COMM 1010, 1440, 2020, 2040, 2060; SPHS 1020 (for international students only) or credit by examination; (b) an appropriate course with substantial oral presentation content as approved by a student's major department in consultation with the Department of Communications Studies); or (c) a proficiency test measuring oral communications competency.

Requirements

1. English (12 hours): Composition: ENGL 1310 or 1313, 1320 or 1323 (ENGL 2700 may be substituted for ENGL 1320 with student's major department approval and the completion of 1310 or 1313, 2210 and 2220).

Literature: ENGL 2210-2220

2. American History (6 hours): HIST 2610-2620 or 6 advanced hours of American History (3 hours of Texas History may substitute for 3 hours of American History).

3. Political Science (6 hours): PSCI 1040 and 1050.

4. Economics (3 hours): ECON 1110, Macroeconomics.

5. Laboratory Science (12 hours): Three courses, each with laboratory; 1 course from Group (1), the Natural and Life Sciences; 1 course from Group (2), the Physical Sciences, and an additional course from either group. Science and non-science major courses may apply.

6. Mathematics: Complete 5 hours in mathematics above the college algebra level: MATH 1190, 1600, 1650, 1680, 2090 or proficiency of pre-calculus or its equivalent.

7. Wellness (3 hours):PHED 1000, DANC 1100, PSYC 2580 or SMHM 1450.

8. Visual and Performing Arts (3 hours): See "University Core Requirements " in the Academics section for approved courses.

9. Understanding of Ideas and Values (6 hours): See "University Core Requirements " in the Academic section for approved courses.

One course per group from any two of the following groups:

10. Foreign Language (6 hours): LANG 2040-2050 or equivalent. See the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for additional information.

Note: Core requirements were being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact a degree program adviser for more information.

Major and Minor

For requirements in the major and minor, students should consult "General University Requirements " in the Academics section, and department or division sections.

Other Requirements

Elective hours as needed at either the lower level or advanced level to meet the minimum of 128 semester hours for graduation, including 42 advanced. Electives should be chosen in consultation with an adviser.

DRED (Traffic Safety) courses may not be used to satisfy any portion of a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Academic Core Programs

Main Departmental Office

General Academic Building, 309A

P.O. Box 305189

Denton, TX 76203-5189

(940) 565-3305

Gloria C. Cox, Director

Introduction

The office of Academic Core Programs offers three special programs that can enrich a student's academic work at UNT: the University Honors Program, National Student Exchange and the Great Books Program.

The University Honors Program provides to academically talented and highly motivated students an opportunity to build a sound educational foundation through an enriched academic environment of honors courses and events beyond the classroom. Honors courses are offered in small classes taught by experienced professors.

Through National Student Exchange (NSE), students have the opportunity for exchange to any of approximately 150 other public colleges and universities throughout the nation. Any undergraduate student who has completed at least one semester at UNT and has a GPA of at least 2.5 is eligible to apply for an exchange.

The Great Books Program offers students an opportunity to become broadly educated by reading some of the world's finest writings. In this two-semester program, students enroll for 9 hours per semester in English, history and philosophy. Students spend class time discussing their readings under the tutelage of professors from each of the three departments.

The CrossFire/Last Lecture Speakers Series offers debates and speeches on issues of current interest and importance. All aspects of programming are handled by a student committee. Student volunteers to serve on the organizing committee are welcome.

University Honors Program

Gloria C. Cox, Director

Introduction

The University Honors Program is committed to providing talented and motivated students with the opportunity for academic excellence within a community of scholars. Honors courses or honors sections of regular courses are specially designed for honors students and are offered in small sections that are taught by experienced faculty members. All honors courses and honors sections of regular courses are designated as such on the student transcript to serve as a permanent record of participation in honors.

Admission to the University Honors Program is obtained by application. Several factors are weighed in admitting new college students to the program, including scores on standardized tests; high school rank-in-class, GPA and transcript; or evidence of special talent, such as writing or music. Continuing UNT students or transfer students from other colleges and universities may enter the University Honors Program upon application and proof of a cumulative GPA of at least 3.25 on a minimum of 15 semester credit hours of college work.

Honors Core Curriculum

Students in the University Honors Program may choose to complete their core requirements through the Honors Core Curriculum. The Honors Core Curriculum replaces University Core Curriculum requirements for those students. However, honors students are required to meet the specific degree requirements of the school or college in which their major is located that are in addition to honors or university core requirements. For example, honors students whose major is in the College of Arts and Sciences must meet not only the requirements of the honors core, but also those additional requirements of the arts and sciences core, such as the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. A list of specific requirements is available from the office of Academic Core Programs. Because honors courses and honors sections are substantially different from regular courses, a student may not duplicate an honors course or section with a non-honors course or section. The University Core Curriculum was being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Consult a degree program adviser or the university's Web site (www.unt.edu/catsched/).

A list of scheduled honors courses is available for each upcoming semester through the office of Academic Core Programs.

Competencies

Honors students are expected to have certain minimum competencies to pursue an undergraduate education at UNT. Competencies may be demonstrated through the successful completion of required courses or by manifested proficiency. The continued development of these competencies should be a part of the whole UNT educational experience, involving the practice of core skills in the major or in electives, as well as in required courses. The competencies in the core curriculum include:

1. Reading and Critical Thinking: Honors students meet this requirement by successful completion of at least 36 honors hours through the Honors Core Curriculum.

2. Computer Science, 0-3 hours: Students are required to demonstrate competency by passing the proficiency exam or passing an equivalent computer science course as specified by degree requirements.

3. Oral Communication, 3 hours: Students are required to demonstrate competency by passing COMM 1440.

Requirements:

1. Exploring Ideas and Values, 6 hours: Students must take two 3-hour courses, at least one of them from b.

a. Philosophy (3 hours).

b. Literature (3 hours).

c. Literature and Culture (3 hours).

2. Community, Citizenship and Communication, 9 hours: Students must take 3 semester hours from each area below.

a. Communication: COMM 1440 (3 hours).

b. Composition (3 hours).

c. U.S. and Texas Politics (3 hours).

3. Discovering American History and Culture, 6 hours: Students must take 3 semester hours from each area below:

a. American History and Culture (3 hours).

b. Diversity in American History and Culture (3 hours).

4. Understanding the World Through Science, Technology and Mathematics, 13 hours:

a. Physical and Life Science (8 hours).

b. Mathematics (5 hours).

5. Exploring the Human Experience, 6 hours: Students must take 3 hours from each area below:

a. Social Science (3 hours).

b. The American Economic and Political Experience (3 hours).

6. Developing Aesthetic Awareness, 3 hours:

a. Visual and Performing Arts (3 hours).

7. Developing a Global Perspective, 3 hours:

a. Honors Capstone Seminar (3 hours).

Other Requirements:

Honors Freshman Seminar, 1 hour.

Wellness, 3 hours in course approved for the University Core Curriculum.

College or School Requirements

Students must satisfactorily complete all degree requirements specified by the school or college in which the degree is offered. In many instances, the college/school/department academic program requirements may exceed the University Honors Program curriculum requirements. Consult the college of your major for complete degree requirements.

Courses of Instruction

All Courses of Instruction are located in one section at the back of this catalog.

Course and Subject Guide

The "Course and Subject Guide," found in the Courses of Instruction section of this book, serves as a table of contents and provides quick access to subject areas and prefixes.

National Student Exchange

Gloria Cox, Campus Coordinator

An undergraduate student at the University of North Texas may apply to spend a semester or a year on exchange at one of more than 150 colleges and universities that are members of the National Student Exchange, a consortium that provides for students within the United States what study abroad programs offer on an international scale. Through NSE a student can travel and live in another part of the nation, take courses that are not offered at UNT, assess an out-of-state institution for graduate study, and enjoy a part of the United States that is quite different from Texas.

UNT's membership in the National Student Exchange makes it possible for a UNT student to attend another NSE member institution at the same cost as attending UNT or at the in-state tuition rate of the other university. The student remains enrolled at UNT, with all the advantages of continuous enrollment. Through NSE coordinators on the two campuses, the tasks of advising, registering for classes and housing can be worked out to provide the student with a smooth exchange experience. UNT students may apply for financial aid on our campus for the semester(s) they will be on exchange.

Students must be enrolled full time at UNT during the semester in which they apply for an exchange and must have a minimum cumulative UNT GPA of at least 2.5 at the time of application and when the exchange actually takes place. All aspects of the application process must be completed by March 1 prior to the academic year in which the student wishes to go on exchange. Since exchanges are limited, an exchange through NSE is a privilege for which the student must be selected.

Students who are interested in learning more about an exchange through NSE should contact the campus coordinator to learn the procedures of applying and qualifying. Interested students should stop by the Academic Core Programs office (GAB 309A) to pick up a copy of the NSE Directory, which explains how the program works and provides detailed information about every school that participates in NSE.

Great Books Program

The Great Books Program is an interdisciplinary exploration of some of the great books of history, philosophy and literature. In the fall semester, students enroll for 9 semester credit hours in ENGL 4130, HIST 4130 and PHIL 4130. In the spring semester, students enroll for an additional 9 semester credit hours in ENGL 4140, HIST 4140 and PHIL 4140.

The goals of the program are to acquaint the student with approximately 80 classics of Western thought; to guide the student in a discussion of the themes, issues and arguments found within these books; and to encourage the student to apply the conclusions learned to contemporary situations of life and thought.

Interdisciplinary Majors

Social Science

An integrated major in social science for the Bachelor of Arts degree requires 48 semester hours in the social sciences, 24 of which must be advanced and must include 18 hours in one field chosen from anthropology, economics, geography (regional science only), history, philosophy, political science, psychology, social work and sociology, plus 30 hours in at least two other of these fields. No minor is required with this major.

Major in Social Science

Following is one suggested four-year degree plan. Students are encouraged to see their adviser each semester for help with program decisions and enrollment. Some requirements may have changed because the University Core Curriculum was being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact a degree program adviser.

BA with a Major in Social Science .pdf

BA with a Major in Social Science

FRESHMAN YEAR

FALL HOURS

ENGL 1310, College Writing I 3

LANG 2040, Foreign Language (intermediate)3 3

MATH 1100, College Algebra4 3

CSCI1 3

Wellness11 3

Total 15

SOPHOMORE YEAR

FALL HOURS

ECON 1110, Principles of Macroeconomics 3

ENGL 2210, World Literature I 3

PSCI 1040, American Government 3

Physical Science9 4

Social Science 3

Total 16

JUNIOR YEAR

FALL HOURS

HIST 2610, United States History to 1865 12 3

Elective (advanced)16 3

Laboratory Science9 4

Social Science 3

Understanding of Ideas and Values8 3

Total 16

SENIOR YEAR

FALL HOURS

Elective16 3

Social Science (advanced) 3

Social Science (advanced) 3

Social Science (advanced) 3

Social Science (advanced) 3

Social Science (advanced) 3

Total 18

FRESHMAN YEAR

SPRING HOURS

ENGL 1320, College Writing II 3

LANG 2050, Foreign Language (intermediate)3 3

MATH 1600, College Math with Calculus5 5

Oral Communication2 3

Total 14

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SPRING HOURS

ENGL 2220, World Literature II 3

PSCI 1050, American Government 3

Elective16 3

Natural Science9 4

Visual and Performing Arts7 3

Total 16

JUNIOR YEAR

SPRING HOURS

HIST 2620, United States History Since 186512 3

Elective16 1

Elective (advanced)16 3

Social Science 3

Social Science (advanced) 3

Understanding of Ideas and Values8 3

Total 16

SENIOR YEAR

SPRING HOURS

Elective (advanced)16 3

Elective (advanced)16 3

Elective (advanced)16 3

Elective (advanced)16 3

Social Science (advanced) 3

Social Science (advanced) 3

Total 18

Actual degree plans may vary depending on availability of courses in a given semester. Some courses may require prerequisites not listed. See Arts and Sciences notes in supplement booklet for footnotes.

Additional requirements for the Social Science (SOCS) major are outlined in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog under "Interdisciplinary Majors."

Contact the SOSC adviser in the Arts and Sciences Office of Student Advising, Room 313, General Academic Building.

General Studies

The general studies major of 36 advanced hours, comprising 12 advanced hours in each of three fields, is subject to the following limitations.

1. At least one field must be chosen from among those offered in the College of Arts and Sciences.

2. If more than one field is chosen from outside the College of Arts and Sciences, both may not be selected from the same school or college.

3. No more than one field may be selected from a single department within the College of Arts and Sciences.

4. A 2.5 grade point average is required on all courses attempted in the major.

5. No more than 24 hours in one field may count toward the degree.

Students also must fulfill all the basic requirements for a BA degree, which include 42 advanced hours and all university and college requirements. For more information concerning this major, including how previously earned college credit will apply toward the degree, contact the academic counselor in the Office of Student Advising, College of Arts and Sciences.

Major in General Studies

Following is one suggested four-year degree plan. Students are encouraged to see their adviser each semester for help with program decisions and enrollment. Some requirements may have changed because the University Core Curriculum was being revised at the time this catalog went to press. Contact a degree program adviser.

BA with a Major in General Studies pdf

BA with a Major in General Studies

FRESHMAN YEAR

FALL HOURS

ENGL 1310, College Writing I 3

LANG 2040, Foreign Language (intermediate)3 3

MATH 1100, College Algebra4 3

CSCI1 3

Wellness11 3

Total 15

SOPHOMORE YEAR

FALL HOURS

ECON 1110, Principles of Macroeconomics 3

ENGL 2210, World Literature I 3

PSCI 1040, American Government 3

Elective16 3

Physical Science9 4

Total 16

JUNIOR YEAR

FALL HOURS

HIST 2610, United States History to 186512 3

Elective16 3

First Field (advanced)13 3

Laboratory Science9 4

Second Field (advanced)13 3

Total 16

SENIOR YEAR

FALL HOURS

Elective16 3

First Field (advanced)13 3

Second Field (advanced)13 3

Third Field (advanced)13 3

Third Field (advanced)13 3

Understanding of Ideas and Values8 3

Total 18

FRESHMAN YEAR

SPRING HOURS

ENGL 1320, College Writing II 3

LANG 2050, Foreign Language (intermediate)3 3

MATH 1600, College Math with Calculus5 5

Oral Communication2 3

Total 14

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SPRING HOURS

ENGL 2220, World Literature II 3

PSCI 1050, American Government 3

Elective16 3

Natural Science9 4

Visual Arts7 3

Total 16

JUNIOR YEAR

SPRING HOURS

HIST 2620, United States History Since 186512 3

Elective16 1

Elective (advanced)16 3

First Field (advanced)13 3

Second Field (advanced)13 3

Understanding of Ideas and Values8 3

Total 16

SENIOR YEAR

SPRING HOURS

Elective (advanced)16 3

Elective (advanced)16 3

First Field (advanced)13 3

Second Field (advanced)13 3

Third Field (advanced)13 3

Third Field (advanced)13 3

Total 18

Actual degree plans may vary depending on availability of courses in a given semester. Some courses may require prerequisites not listed. See Arts and Sciences notes in supplement booklet for footnotes.

Additional requirements for the General Studies (GNST) major are outlined in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog under "Interdisciplinary Majors."

Contact the GNST adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences Office of Student Advising, Room 313, General Academic Building.

Interdisciplinary Minors

Alternative Dispute Resolution

A minor in alternative dispute resolution requires a total of 21 hours, including 9 advanced, and consists of AECO 2120, 4120, 4420 and COMM 2025, plus three courses from the following list chosen in consultation with an adviser in the Institute of Applied Economics and representing at least two different academic departments: AECO 4020, BLAW 3430, CJUS 3210, MGMT 3870 or PSYC 3640.

Students interested in this minor should contact Dr. William L. McKee, Institute of Applied Economics, Wooten Hall.

Asian Studies

Various courses are offered in the areas of anthropology, art, history, geography, philosophy and political science to complete a minor in Asian studies. Students interested in this minor should contact Dr. Harold Tanner, Department of History, Wooten Hall.

Social Science

A minor in social science requires 6 hours in one department and 12 hours in another department, including 6 advanced hours. Courses may be chosen from the following areas: anthropology, economics, geography (regional science only), history, philosophy, political science, psychology, social work and sociology.

Women's Studies

A minor in women's studies may be earned for the bachelor's degree by successfully completing WMST 2100 (Women and Society: An Introduction to Women's Studies), WMST 4100 (Varieties of Feminist Thought), and four additional courses listed for women's studies credit. These courses include, but are not limited to, the following: AGER 4700 (Women in Later Life), ANTH 2045 (Women in Culture), COMM 4220 (Gender and Communication), CJUS 2600 (Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice), ECON 3150 (Economics of Discrimination), HIST 4460 (Women in United States History), PSCI 2100 (Women and Politics), PSYC 3490 (Psychological Dynamics of Women), PSYC 3640 (Psychological Factors in Marital Adjustment), PSYC 4000 (Abuse in Adult Relationships), PSYC 4470 (Psychology and Sexual Behavior), SOCI 2010 (Race, Class, Gender and Ethnicity), SOCI 3000 (Sociology of Marriage and Family), SOCI 4250 (Sex Roles: Male and Female in Contemporary Society) and SOCI 4450 (The Family in Later Life). Academic departments throughout the university offer additional women's studies courses every semester.

More than 30 faculty members regularly teach courses examining women's roles, activities, and experiences throughout history and across cultures. These courses expand understanding of gender differences, cultural diversity, and social change, while strengthening critical thinking and communication skills. Teaching areas of the faculty currently include anthropology; applied gerontology; communication studies; criminal justice; economics; English; foreign languages and literatures; history; journalism; philosophy; political science; psychology; radio, television and film; religion studies; and sociology. The faculty of women's studies regularly presents colloquia and lectures concerning their research and current issues in women's studies.

Students interested in this minor should contact Dr. Claire L. Sahlin, Director of Women's Studies, General Academic Building 302, P.O. Box 305189, Denton, TX 76203-5189; (940) 565-2098; e-mail: sahlin@unt.edu.

Preprofessional Programs

Health-Related Preprofessional Programs

College of Arts and Sciences

Office of Student Advising

Health Professions Advising

General Academic Building, 313

(940) 565-2051

Robin Henry, Health Professions Counselor

Premedicine and Pre-Dentistry

The Health Professions Counselor assists all students in meeting entrance requirements, completing the application process, and acquiring required recommendations for admission to a professional school. Students who wish to apply to a professional school should attend an orientation session when they enter the university and the informational seminars conducted by the Pre-Professional Advisory Committee. Students in their junior year should attend the application seminars, starting in February. Exact date, times, and location are posted in Room 313 of the General Academic Building.

The recommended course of study is a bachelor's degree in a field of interest to the student. Courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics are necessary for admission to medical or dental school.

During the spring semester before application to medical or dental school, the student should take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) or the Dental Aptitude Test (DAT) and should begin an application file with the Health Professions Counselor in the General Academic Building, Room 313. The application process usually takes place during the spring semester of the junior year and includes an interview with the Pre-Professional Advisory Committee.

Early Admission

Students seeking early admission into medical or dental school should consult the chair of the Preprofessional Advisory Committee for information on the use of credits earned in basic sciences during the first year of medical or dental school toward a bachelors degree from UNT.

Seven-Year Dual Degree Program

A seven-year dual degree program is offered jointly by the University of North Texas and the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM) at the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth (UNTHSC-FW). Students in bachelor's degree programs in biology, chemistry or biochemistry may apply for this program. Students should initiate their application at TCOM. Further information may be obtained by contacting the Office of Medical Student Admissions at (800) 535-TCOM or the Health Professions Counselor, General Academic Building, Room 313.

Health-Related Preprofessional Programs

UNT offers all of the university requirements for admission to health and allied health preprofessional programs including: chiropractic, dental hygiene, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and others.

Students interested in the above fields should consult with the Health Professions Counselor, General Academic Building, Room 313. The counselor can assist in selecting a program of study to meet the entrance requirements for the various programs in and out of Texas.

Two-Year Program for Engineering Students

Although UNT has no school of engineering, students may complete two years of an engineering curriculum. Students should plan their UNT program to coincide with the requirements of the selected engineering school.

Students who wish to pursue a pre-engineering program should consult with the pre-engineering adviser in the Department of Engineering Technology.

Pre-Theology and Pre-Seminary Studies

UNT offers programs specifically designed for students intending to pursue post-baccalaureate work in seminaries or divinity schools. Students wishing to pursue such studies should consult with the chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religion Studies.

Other Preprofessional Programs

These should be planned to coincide with requirements of the professional school selected after consultation with the Office of Student Advising in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Top | Undergraduate Catalog College of Arts and Sciences Contents | UNT Undergraduate Catalog Shortcuts | Additional Undergraduate Literature | Graduate Catalog College of Arts and Sciences Contents