For detailed information, check the The National Weather Service.

Learn what to do

Read a message to the campus community about what to do when you're on campus in the event of a weather-related emergency »

Keeping an eye on the sky

In the event of severe weather in the North Texas region, the UNT community can turn to several sources of information regarding official severe weather warnings, storm tracking, and building emergency plans.These include the UNT web site, Eagle Alert messages, the UNT Facebook page and @UNTEagleAlert (UNT's UNT's official campus emergency Twitter account) e-mail messages from the university, 88.1 KNTU-FM, and NTTV. If severe weather moves into the Denton area, UNT community members should also listen for the city of Denton warning system located on campus.

Learn the difference between a watch and warning.

When it comes to tornado and other weather dangers, UNT has two things in its favor - massive buildings and an emergency warning system. Speakers are mounted atop three poles on campus. The warning system is tested on the first Wednesday of every month, using the actual warning sound. If a tornado is spotted near UNT, those speakers would emit a three-minute siren loud enough to be heard across the campus.

Learn what to do if there is a tornado.

 

Information about road conditions

Individuals who commute long distances to campus may want to contact the Texas Department of Transportation's area hotline for information on road conditions at (800) 452-9292. The 24-hour recording is updated regularly and includes information on highways in Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Kaufman, Navarro and Rockwall counties.

For information on road conditions in other counties, call the Texas Department of Transportation directly at (800) 452-9292. View a detailed report of road closures that you customize based on your location.

To access the Broadcast Notification System or to reach the university switchboard, call (940) 565-2000 or metro (817) 267-3731.

Watch videos and learn more about emergency preparedness »