What you can do to prepare for severe weather at UNT

The North Texas area could see some severe weather now that spring has arrived. It’s important to remember that there is no official start of severe weather season in North Texas. Severe weather can occur at any time during the year, so it’s good to always be prepared.

But as the time of the year approaches when the likelihood for severe weather increases, it’s a good time to review what should be done to keep the campus community safe.

The most important thing a person can do is take responsibility for his or her own safety. Before an emergency arises, take the time to:

  • Keep Eagle Alert information up to date at my.unt.edu. This is the primary means by which UNT community members receive emergency notifications (e.g., Tornado Warning). Also follow @UNTEagleAlert on Twitter to get up to date information as an emergency situation unfolds.
  • Stay aware. When severe weather is in the forecast, keep an eye on the weather. The National Weather Service is a reliable resource for rapidly changing weather conditions. Follow the UNT Office of Emergency Management and Safety Services Office on Twitter and Facebook for ongoing updates as well.
  • Attend Emergency Readiness Training provided by UNT Police and the Office of Emergency Management and Safety Services. This training provides information and resources available to assist in maintaining preparedness. Topics include severe weather, medical emergencies and responses, active threats of violence, active shooter preparedness and resources available to our community. You can also request a class.
  • Identify the nearest shelter areas. Shelter areas are designated for every building on campus and can be viewed at UNT Emergency Floor Plans or via the UNT Mean Green Ready App.
  • Learn common weather terms:
    • Severe thunderstorm watch—Severe thunderstorms are possible. Remain alert for approaching storms, watch the sky and stay tuned to NOAA Weather Radios, commercial radio or the local news for more information.
    • Severe thunderstorm warning—A severe thunderstorm has been sighted or indicated by weather radar and people in the area should take shelter immediately.
    • Tornado watch—Tornadoes are possible. Be alert for approaching storms, watch the sky and stay tuned to NOAA Weather Radios, commercial radio or the local news for more information.
    • Tornado warning—A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar and people in the area should take shelter immediately.
  • Learn what to do regarding common hazards associated with severe weather and what resources are available to help you prepare for severe weather. Visit UNT Emergency Management and NWS Weather Safety to learn more about severe weather information and tools available to help with preparedness efforts.