Graduate opportunities

The graduate programs in the Department of History at the University of North Texas help you shape the future in higher education, public service and research.

We offer course work leading to a Master of Arts, Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. On the master's level, you can focus your studies on the history of the United States or Europe, as well as the Ancient World and many non-western countries. On the doctoral level, concentrations are available in U.S., European or military history.

Graduate classes normally include eight to 12 students, allowing you to receive personal attention from the instructor. Course offerings are available in the areas noted above as well as in environmental, imperial and women's and gender history. Our department has special strengths in Texas history, military history, and body, place and identity. Through extensive reading, writing assignments and specialized seminar classes, you'll strengthen your analytical, writing, research and presentation skills.

Our classes are taught by faculty who've published numerous books and articles, been awarded many research grants and earned national and international recognition in their fields.

Gain new perspectives

In addition to formal course work, other learning opportunities are available. Several nationally and internationally recognized speakers address faculty and students on different topics each year. Fellow graduate students provide useful information as you move through various stages of the degree program, such as notices about deadlines, job openings, scholarship opportunities and other general information about graduate work in history.

The UNT chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the national history honor society, organizes scholarly and social events during the year. Many graduate students present their research to fellow professionals at regional and national conferences. The department offers travel grants to students on a competitive basis.

Research resources

Our department houses the Kingsbury-Thomason Departmental Library, the Military History Center and an extensive collection of books and films. The department hosts events related to the study of military history, social and cultural history and Texas history. The department also houses the scholarly journal Military History of the West.

The UNT Libraries contain 7 million cataloged items of printed books, periodicals, maps, documents, audiovisual materials, music scores and electronic media. The Willis Library houses the general collection, the Oral History Collection, the University Archives, the Rare Book and Texana collections, and government documents.

Additional relevant research holdings at UNT include:

  • The Béxar Archives collection on microfilm
  • British cabinet records (1868-1945)
  • Captured German documents (1867-1945)
  • Documents on the Nuremberg trials of the 1940s
  • Federal and state documents
  • Large collection of U.S. State Department papers
  • Major European newspapers
  • Microfilmed papers of U.S. presidents and other important figures
  • Parliamentary records of the larger European nations
  • Service records of Civil War soldiers
  • 67 volumes of unedited documents relating to the Spanish Empire in the Western Hemisphere
  • Texas newspapers
  • U.S. Census records

The Oral History Collection, among the nation's oldest and largest, contains more than 1,800 bound volumes. Taped and transcribed interviews focus on the political, cultural and business history of Texas, the Pacific theater of World War II, local African American history, and various other local and regional topics. Graduate students who take courses in applied history have the opportunity to add to this nationally recognized collection.

Graduate students also have access to several other major libraries and institutions in the Dallas-Fort Worth region, including the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, the National Archives at Fort Worth, the Dallas Public Library, the Dallas Historical Society and libraries of numerous area colleges and universities.

Attending UNT

Admission requirements

You must meet the admission requirements of the Toulouse Graduate School® and specific program requirements by Jan. 15 for fall admission. The graduate school's admission requirements are outlined at the grad school website. The program requirements are:

Master's programs

  • GRE score in the 50th percentile or higher on the verbal reasoning portion
  • GRE score of a 4.0 or higher on the analytical writing portion or 40th percentile on the quantitative reasoning portion
  • 3.5 GPA overall or on the last 60 semester hours of undergraduate course work
  • Statement of purpose for seeking a master's degree in history at UNT
  • Two letters of recommendation addressing your academic qualifications and ability to succeed in an advanced history degree program

Ph.D. program

  • GRE score in the 70th percentile or higher on the verbal reasoning portion
  • GRE score either at the 40th percentile or higher on the quantitative reasoning portion or a 4.0 or higher on the analytical writing portion
  • 3.6 or higher GPA overall of master's level course work
  • Statement of purpose for seeking a doctorate in history at UNT
  • Three letters of recommendation addressing your academic qualifications and ability to succeed in an advanced history degree program
  • Written master's thesis
  • Formal paper completed as part of master's-level work

Degree requirements

M.A. and M.S. degrees

Thesis option
  • 18 semester hours of required course work
  • 6 semester hours of research seminars
  • 6 semester hours of thesis credit
  • 3 semester hours of a historical bibliography course
  • Oral defense of thesis
  • Reading knowledge of one foreign language (M.A. degree only)
Non-thesis option
  • 24 semester hours of required course work
  • 6 semester hours of research seminars
  • 3 semester hours of a historical bibliography course
  • Oral exam on the course work
  • Reading knowledge of one foreign language (M.A. degree only)
Ph.D. degree
  • 15 semester hours of required history reading courses
  • 12 semester hours of history research seminar courses
  • 3 semester hours of a historiography course
  • 12 semester hours minimum of dissertation research
  • Reading knowledge of one foreign language
  • Comprehensive exams (oral and written) in four different fields of topical or chronological history
  • Dissertation that contributes significantly to the study of history
  • Oral defense of dissertation

Financial assistance

The department provides scholarships, teaching assistantships, teaching fellowships, research assistantships and other types of financial assistance for graduate students. Applications for financial assistance administered by the department are available from November through January and should be submitted by Feb. 15 for the following academic year. For more information, visit our website.

The university also provides several methods to help you pay for your education. For more information on these opportunities, visit the financial aid website.

Faculty

Roberto Calderón, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of California-Los Angeles. Mexican American history; borders and national identities; comparative social movements.

Randolph B. Campbell, Regents Professor; Ph.D., University of Virginia. Early national period of U.S. 1789-1846; 19th century Texas; state and local history.

Guy Chet, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Yale University. Colonial America; early modern Atlantic world; American Revolution; military history (17th-19th centuries).

Christopher Fuhrmann, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. Ancient and early medieval history; classical Greece and Rome.

Sandra Mendiola Garcia, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Rutgers University. Latin America; Mexico.

Richard M. Golden, Professor; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. Early modern Europe; France; religious and social history; State of Israel.

Constance Hilliard, Professor; Ph.D., Harvard University. Africa; African American history.

Kate Imy, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Rutgers University. British Empire; modern Britain; gender; military history.

Michael Leggiere, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Florida State University. French Revolution and Napoleon; modern France.

Richard Lowe, Regents Professor; Ph.D., University of Virginia. U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction; 19th century South.

Richard McCaslin, Professor and Department Chair; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin. Texas; 19th century U.S. military history.

Alex Mendoza, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Texas Tech University. 19th century U.S.; Texas; U.S. military history.

Alfred Mierzejewski, Professor; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. Modern Germany; 20th century business and economics; military history.

Rachel Moran, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. Gender, health and medicine; U.S. history; women.

Marilyn Morris, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of London. 17th and 18th century Britain; gender and sexuality; Enlightenment.

Todd Moye, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin. 20th century U.S. social, political and cultural history; oral history.

Clark Pomerleau, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Arizona. U.S. women, gender and sexuality.

Gustav L. Seligmann, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Arizona. U.S. constitutional history; American political parties; presidential elections.

F. Todd Smith, Professor; Ph.D., Tulane University. Spanish and French North America; Southern Plains Indians.

Nancy Stockdale, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of California-Santa Barbara. Middle East; Islam.

Harold M. Tanner, Professor; Ph.D., Columbia University. 20th century China (political, diplomatic, intellectual and military); U.S.-China relations.

Andrew Torget, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Virginia. Old South; Texas; 19th century U.S.-Mexican Borderlands; digital scholarship.

Olga Velikanova, Associate Professor; Ph.D., St. Petersburg State University (Russia). Russia.

Jennifer Wallach, Associate Professor; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst. African Americans; American food history.

Geoffrey Wawro, Professor; Ph.D., Yale University. 19th, 20th and 21st century; modern military history.

Michael Wise, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. American West; environmental history.